24 Aug 1995[12] 6 3, 4, 5, 6 5, 6 95 This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.

try this…if you place all your graphics and set up a figure number style, and place some of your styles in an inline text frame and the ones that need to fall outside the text frame, the numbering will be off, UNTIL you take the blue anchor frame and anchor it to text of the stand alone graphics, then the figure numbers will then be in order. It also works on 11×17 pages where you have to link the figure number to the previous page and then Anchor Object options and use the Inline or above Line (position) to move text frame to the next page. :-)
You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
I love Adobe InDesign. For multi-page documents, it’s the most flexible and complete application out there. Yet I remember how counter-intuitive some things were when I was learning it for the first time. Here are some tips I wish I had known when starting out, as well as some answers to questions that others often ask me. This is not intended to be a manual; some good ones are already out there (although I personally learned by doing). Hopefully, these tips will help you make the best of your day-to-day use of InDesign. If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.
Pros: Oh my, I have been using this program since 1997! Wow, I'm old! But the program has aged far better than I have, certainly. What's really remarkable is that despite all the years, the GUI is still intuitive and well laid out. It's also easier to 'ramp up from zero' (at least I think so, I'm sure I'm biased somehow having used it for so long) and get busy on real work.

Microsoft’s own Publisher program is a step down from those applications in both power and price, but not every version of Office includes Publisher, and it costs $140 to purchase separately. However, chances are good that you already own a copy of Microsoft Word, and that software has a host of desktop publishing tools that you can use to produce pages that rival the output of the best layout artist.

If you’re like most designers, you spend a significant amount of time picking just the right font, including previewing the way it appears in different parts of your layout. So you’re going to be very happy about a new method of previewing and selecting fonts. Plus, InDesign CC 2019 introduces a new font type that supports glyphs with colors and gradients.


Another common mistake: be careful when enlarging or reducing the size of the images. If you import an image, for example 15x10 cm at 300 dpi, but want to enlarge it to 45x30 cm, the resolution decreases proportionally (in this example, it's going to 100 dpi), so the quality will be affected. On the contrary, if you reduce the image to 3x2 cm the resolution will increase proportionally (in this example, 1500 dpi). Both are bad, so you should be careful with the resolution. Remember, 300 dpi should be the resolution at real size, not before enlarging or reducing.
      So essentially you now have the option to pay $99 per year and always have the latest version of the software for the term of your premium membership. For example, if you pay the $99 membership fee, you will automatically receive version X7 when it is released. Or you can just buy the latest version of the software and keep the standard account. You will miss out on the so-called extra online content which, hopefully, will evolve and provide more reasons to choose the premium service.
Anyway, there's a good alternative: create a PDF. To do this, you can go to File > Publish to PDF (or go to File > Export (CTRL+I), and there choose PDF). But it is not enough just to create a PDF, since not all the PDF's have the same configuration. For example, a PDF for the web will produce a PDF of low quality but it will be a small file, suitable for attaching to an email or using on a web page. But for printing, we need the opposite: images of high quality and resolution. PDF settings is also a topic that requires a lengthy explanation, but this excedes the scope of the current tutorial. There are many different configurations, according to each company's work flow. But we propose a simple format that should work with most of the job outputs: choose PDF X-3 in the PDF Presets drop-down list, then go to "Settings" and change the "Compatibility" to Acrobat 8.0 or higher. Why? Because the PDF X-3 is a good standard but it has a default compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, which does not support transparencies and lenses. This problem is solved by changing the compatibility.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).

If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.
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