In 1995-6 I “wrote a book” on my Shakespearian laptop (already out of date at the time!). Now laptop is “broken” (no display on screen), how can I “read” this old format programme? (Old Word prog) Also have it on floppy disc but of course current PC’s have no floppy input, and please I don’t want to have to spend any money on new kit ‘cos I don’t have any spare! Many thanks, Hilary
First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.

When you start working with the new Properties panel, you’ll likely find yourself frustrated because it’s just “version 1” and is a work in progress. For example, when you see an ellipsis (…) at the lower right of a section, clicking it expands the section to show additional choices. However, currently the collapsed or expanded state isn’t “sticky” between sessions, so it often closes even when you want it to stay open.


i have a similar but bigger problem… the thing is that i installed the same font on 2 different machines (both with same os and software) the font is gill sans condensed, but it looks different on each one… the machines have exactly the same stuff and configuration… i even checked the screen dpi, the font smothness, etc but had no luck, anyone had this problem before? they look way too different, as if it was another font, but if i open a flash document, it would warn you if the font wasn’t installed, but it doesn’t (so this means that the font is installed) it just displays different… any clue?
Making an index in InDesign has always been hard, but here are two little changes that help: first, the size of the New Cross-Reference field in the Index panel has been enlarged, providing more space to find and locate index entries. Second, there’s now a Find field in the same dialog box to search within the index entries. Simply type the search term in the field, and use the Find Next Entry and Find Previous Entry buttons (arrows) to view the index entries.
Pros: I use this software from so many years ago and with the time they have always improve, I use this to modify and edit images vectorizing and making great design for my presentations, through the years Corel DRAW have added more features and options to make the design more complex and details, the bright options and the vectorizing tool are better than they were in the past, the details of the images is awesome and the extension are endless, for design this is one of my favorites.
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).

The Classification filter (Figure 7) shows the same categories and icons that are found on the Typekit/Adobe Fonts website for filtering fonts. There are icons for each of eight classifications that were available in earlier InDesign versions, such as Serif, Script, and so on. You can also select properties for weight, width, x-height, contrast, standard or CAPS only, and Default Figure Style.
Using Emoji fonts, you can include various colorful and graphical characters, such as smileys, flags, street signs, animals, people, food, and landmarks in your documents. Of course, you can’t just type an emoji inside InDesign, so to insert them, you can copy and paste them from another program, or double-click them inside the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs).
You could include things like empty spaces and paragraph breaks in your search if you know, for example, that the word that has to change is followed by a space. Insert these special characters by clicking the “@” arrow to the right of the Find box, or search for a particular glyph by going to the Glyph tab. Replacing glyphs one by one might be best, so that you can monitor your work and progress.
Yes, it is also possible to manually change a color (Edit > Find and Replace > Replace Objects > Replace a Color...), but it is necessary to change every color and every shade of this color for each page. The Color Styles docker will replace the color and all shades on all pages in just one step. But it is important to remember that it is necessary to "apply" the Color Style to the object, since it is not enough to be "Yellow" or the same color (e.g. Pantone 012), the Color Style must be applied. When you change the Color Style, only the objects using that style will change, not all yellow objects.

The described numbering process is useful. I’m wondering what the Best Practice would be to ensure that the text frame containing the figure / section / chapter number remains locked to the figure that it refers to. A couple of attempts I’m tried haven’t been successful. Perhaps I’m not applying the technique properly or I’m unaware of another approach. Anyone have a suggestion or two?

Home Screen/Start workspace changes. The initial screen you see after launching InDesign is now called the Home screen, and it still appears as the Start Workspace. By default, it also appears any time that when no documents are open. You can turn it off by going to the General pane of the Preferences dialog box and turning off Show ‘Start’ Workspace When No Documents Are Open.
Therefore, if you send an image with 600 dpi or higher resolution, this will produce only slower and larger files but will not improve the resolution. Some people send images with 1800 dpi, 2400 dpi and more and this only creates much larger files, but does not increase the quality of the output. You'll see it better on screen if you zoom in on the image, but the printed result will be 300/400 dpi. Some people ask about inkjet printers that claim to print at 2400 dpi or more. There's a lot of confusion about this, since they use "dpi" (talking about printed dots per inch), which is the printing quality, not the resolution of the images. And, for large format printers (plotters), there is no need to use high resolution bitmaps ̶ on the contrary, the larger the size the lower the resolution needed. But, since they don't produce color separations and the printing process is totally different, the "300 dpi" standard is not applied to plotters, laser or inkjets.
Corel draw has a number of associated programs which are sold as a package when you purchase Corel draw and these are created to work in the same. Photo paint allows you edit photos and othe images for many purposes. A very rounded package of graphic and desktop publishing tools. Corel draw allows you to save and export files in a wide range of types.
Choose the XVL Studio 3D CAD add-on option to get animation tools and work with 3D CAD Engineering files. XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition adds native 3D CAD file format support to ensure support for assemblies and parts from 3D CAD systems, including CATIA, Inventor, PTC Creo, SolidWorks, NX as well as 3D CAD exchange file formats incl. STEP, JT, and others.
Virtual Memory is used by Windows to swap information from RAM to the hard disk in order to free memory for use by applications when physical RAM is low. A paging file is used to accomplish this task. By default, Windows manages the paging file size and sets it to 1.5 times the amount of RAM on the system. This can be increased in cases where CorelDRAW appears to slow as a result of graphic and object intensive documents. When setting the paging size, the max size should never exceed 3 times that amount of physical RAM installed on the computer. To increase Virtual Memory settings, please consult the Windows help files. desktop numbering using publisher
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