The CorelWORLD Real Life Video Tutorials was produced for the CorelWORLD Conference. The video package features more than 2.5 hours of tutorials on CorelDRAW, including extensive lessons on Corel® PHOTO-PAINT™. Discover how easy a difficult task can be when you apply the correct process, and see why things go wrong when you don't make the right choices. The tutorial package is included for free with the WorkPLACE Ready Training Package.
I am editing a lengthy document (140 pages) in Spanish. At the beginning of the document I could right click on a word and get a list of synonyms and had the option in most cases of looking at a thesaurus as well. But as I progressed in the document, the synonym / thesaurus function stopped appearing as a option. I’m using MSOffice 2013. How can I get it back?
At this point, you could click OK and start your document. But, let's modify the scheme instead. Click the Define New Number Format button. In the resulting dialog, click the Font button and choose Chiller from the Font list and click OK (only once). Click inside the Number format control—to the left of the example character—and enter Heading, as shown in Figure D. Click OK twice. If you check the properties now (Figure B), you'll find a numbering scheme. Click OK once more to return to the document. Heading 1 in the Styles Quick Gallery displays the new numbering scheme.

If you use the same page size and language for most of your documents, you can change these defaults with no document open. For example, to change the default page size, close all documents, choose File > Document Setup, and select a desired page size. To set a default dictionary, close all documents, choose Edit > Preferences > Dictionary (Windows) or InDesign > Preferences > Dictionary (Mac OS), and select an option from the Language menu.
Keyboard shortcuts for kerning and tracking are awesome for quickly experimenting with type and for copyfitting. But InDesign’s default increment of 20/1000 ths of an em is HUGE. I knocked it down to 5 in the Kerning/Tracking field (Preferences > Units & Increments > Keyboard Increments). Maybe you love it—leave it alone. Maybe you think it’s too small—bump it up. The point is, you can make this setting work for you.
You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.

   If you are a shop that relies on one version of CorelDRAW and it is installed on multiple computers, you may be in for a surprise and added expense if you update to a service pack 6.1 or higher, or if you decide that when a new version of CorelDRAW comes out, you want to upgrade and install one license on a number of computers. For example, if you usually have four people working at the same time on their own computers, then each version on each computer will require its own license. I know that a lot of shops have the same version of CorelDRAW on multiple computers. So, when upgrade time comes you could be in for a significantly higher cost.
   For most of us, once we have upgraded, we never take the time to see exactly what was updated in the software. I must admit, I can be guilty of clicking on the update button with little regard for what is being installed on my system. Sometimes I upgrade CorelDRAW or other software updates and never really look at what has been changed or fixed within the service pack. I just assume it is better.

Lastly, please do not use the keyboard shortcuts in this article to achieve foot and inch marks. The true marks are in the Symbol font – or can be found in the “glyphs” palette. The other marks are prime and double prime; seasoned designers and typographers know the difference, just as they know the differences and uses between hyphens, en-dashes and em-dashes.
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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