The same happens with the styles of text and graphics. Suppose that we are working on a magazine, and we use Garamond, 24 pts for titles and Times New Roman, 11 pts for the body of the text. But after we have finished, our customer wants to change the fonts, and asks us to use Humanist777 - 30 pts for the titles and HelveticaNeue LT Pro 55 Roman - 12 pts for the body of the text. Although you can change it manually if we edit the Style of the titles it will change on all the pages in a second.

It's not good if the file is opened in a different version of the program because some things can change. For example, the fills of CorelDRAW X7 are quite different to those of previous versions and also allow selective transparency. For this reason, if you save the file back as a previous version, the program will ask if you want to convert text to curves and fills to bitmaps.


More than one person can work simultaneously in a document. In Word Online and Word 2016, real-time presence helps you see where your co-authors are working in the document so that you don't create conflicts as you edit, and you can see changes as they're being made. Word 2013 supports simultaneous editing, but there is no presence indication, and changes can't be seen by multiple authors until the document is saved. To learn more about real-time co-authoring, see What's new in Word Online and Collaborate on Word documents with real-time co-authoring.

You Forgot to mention the awesome new Spinning Beach Ball Feature in Indesign 2019…. yea hundreds of upgraders report Spinning Beach Balls at every turn.. even in iMac Pros w/ 40GB of RAM.. Yea just like last year, riddled with Bugs. I’ll stick with 13.1.0 until March or April 2019 when Adobe addresses all this and more in the one and only update for the year. Quark is waiting stage left.
I’d have to know what you mean by “come apart” and exactly how you send it. If you’re actually sending a WORD document (.docx, .doc) then this article you just commented on should answer your question: word documents DON’T necessarily display the same everywhere. Generally the “right” way to publish is to save as PDF and send PDFs around — it’s actually exactly why PDF was invented. 🙂
If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.
There it is. Page 2.…If I click inside there I can see it's actually…the word page and the number two.…So if I were to, for example, add additional pages…after page one these would labeled incorrectly…because there not using automatic page numbering.…So let's start by removing these by clicking the border,…and then hitting the Delete key on your keyboard.…

Português: Inserir Números de Página no Word, Español: insertar números de página en Word, Italiano: Inserire i Numeri di Pagina in Word, Русский: добавить номера страниц в Word, Français: insérer des numéros de page dans Word, Deutsch: In Word Seitenzahlen einfügen, العربية: إدراج أرقام الصفحات في برنامج وورد, Bahasa Indonesia: Menambahkan Nomor Halaman di Microsoft Word, Nederlands: Paginanummers invoegen in Microsoft Word

Acrobat’s PDF comment and review features are widely used for marking up documents, but there has always been a frustrating limitation: you couldn’t see those comments where you needed to most… on your InDesign page! (There have been some third-party add-ons that have helped with this, including the Annotations plug-in from DTP Tools.) Now, with CC 2019, you can import comments added in Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader as part of a review process, and the comments will show in the context of your InDesign layout (Figures 8 and 9). Even better, InDesign can now make some changes for you, including inserting or deleting text that has been marked in the PDF!
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.

Whether they're getting ready to win or ready to enter your big event, your guests will love the thrill of entering with our raffle tickets. Each ticket comes with a twin ticket, which means you get to keep one while they keep the other – there's no memorizing of entry numbers with these ticket! Also the number of the ticket remains with your patrons as long as the ticket does! Plus, with the great selection of colors we offer, the ticket isn't going to get lost any time soon.


Tip: Normally, the visibility and printability should be enabled or disabled together. Remember, a visible layer cannot be printed or exported if printability is disabled, and a non-visible layer can be printed and exported if printability is enabled. A layer that is visible but non-printable can be used to keep notes with the file. I use such a layer to keep the print details and other job information, so that I can refer to them at any time.
From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.
Overall: I started learning graphic design on Corel way back when... and then I switched to Adobe and learned the ins and outs of that. Then eventually got a job that was already using Corel so I went back to it. They are very similar... I like them both in terms of Draw vs Illustrator... but Photo Paint vs Photoshop, well, Photoshop will beat them there. With that said, I can still make Photo Paint do what I want so it works.
To change the default, choose High Quality from the Default View menu in the Display Performance panel of Preferences. For good measure, I also unchecked Preserve Object Level Settings so that even graphics that are set to Fast or Typical (via Object > Display Performance) always display at High Quality. (But what about that big background graphic that is slowing you down? Put it on a layer and hide it. Don’t display it as a shadow of its former self.)
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.

You could include things like empty spaces and paragraph breaks in your search if you know, for example, that the word that has to change is followed by a space. Insert these special characters by clicking the “@” arrow to the right of the Find box, or search for a particular glyph by going to the Glyph tab. Replacing glyphs one by one might be best, so that you can monitor your work and progress.

The true power of Microsoft Publisher is in the superb quality and selection of its templates. Unlike so many of its competitors, Publisher links to Microsoft Office's online template portfolio, which is regularly updated and sports crisp, clean designs that can easily jump-start your projects. The template selection isn't particularly huge – you can only expect access to about 700 different options, compared to the thousands that other programs offer – but it's diverse, covering every type of project you might undertake. Microsoft hasn't tried to inflate its numbers by offering dozens of variants of the same template.

Create macros and add-ins with the integrated Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for Applications (VSTA) and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). With the enhanced automation interface, developers can create utilities and macros that can interact with the drawing page. Using the new classes and methods, you can now create even more powerful utilities and macros to enhance the applications in CorelDRAW Technical Suite.
When working with large files in CorelDRAW, it may be required to increase the amount of memory allocated to the application. Default memory allocation is set to 25%. This can be increased to as high as 50%, though it is not recommended to exceed this level. Increasing this setting beyond 50% will reduce the amount of RAM being used by Windows, decreasing performance of the entire computer. It may also be required to change drives being used as swap disks. Drives with a high capacity of free space are ideally suited for swap disks. It is also recommended that the primary disk be set to a drive which does not contain the Windows partition. This will improve read and write times if specifying a drive with little or no disk activity.
   For most of us, once we have upgraded, we never take the time to see exactly what was updated in the software. I must admit, I can be guilty of clicking on the update button with little regard for what is being installed on my system. Sometimes I upgrade CorelDRAW or other software updates and never really look at what has been changed or fixed within the service pack. I just assume it is better.
To line up images relative to each other across the page, select the images and click the Picture Tools tab on the Ribbon; then click Format > Align > Align Selected Objects. Finally, click Format > Align once more, and click Align Top (to align their top edges) or Align Bottom (to align their bottom edges). When you click Format > Align, you’ll see that you can also choose Distribute Vertically or Distribute Horizontally to space images evenly down the page margin or space them evenly relative to each other (depending on whether you select Align to Page or Align Selected Objects).
After adding a few more facts, as shown in Figure F, you might notice something new—the two-digit numbers don't align with the previous one-digit numbers. You could leave the list as is, but most likely you'll want to adjust it. Leaving it as is makes the reader uncomfortable; it's simply not as readable as it should be. We expect numbers to align using the period character or the right-most digit if there's no punctuation.
For example, imagine that we start a job with 2 colors, Blue and Yellow. Instead of applying these colors to each individual object, it is better to create two Color Styles and apply these to the objects (to create a new color style, select the object and right-click and choose > Color Styles > New from Selected…), If you need to use shades of each color (such as 10% of Blue, 20%, 30%, etc) you can choose "Create Gradient" on the same Color Styles docker (Window > Dockers > Color Styles), or (CTRL+F6).

Last year, though, a brilliant production artist mentioned to me that nobody really knows picas except for people with newspaper training. Whether this is true or not, it freed me up to work in inches. Let go of your guilt and work in the measurement system you prefer. Choose different options from the Horizontal and Vertical menus in the Units & Increments panel of the Preferences dialog.
      When you install the update or service pack, you are prompted to log in or create an account. Figure 1 shows the log in screen that you are presented with when you install CorelDRAW or a new update. You do not have to create an account but if you don’t, you will not receive updates to your software. For this reason, you really do need to create an account. To create an account, click on the blue “Create an Account” button.

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When making an index for Japanese text, the yomi for index entries in the Topic Level box should be entered in the Yomi box using full-width hiragana and katakana. It is not necessary to input the yomi for full-width hiragana, katakana, alphanumeric characters, some symbols, half-width alphanumeric characters, or index entries that only have symbols in the Yomi box. Entries input in the Topic Level box are sorted. In some cases, when full-width and half-width symbols are mixed in an entry, sorting may not take place as expected. An appropriate, yomi should be entered in these cases.
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