When you purchase a software program, you are generally given a license to use that software. Typically, this license gives you the ability to install the software on one, two or three computers, depending on the terms of the license. When I talk about installing CorelDRAW on a computer or computers, I am talking about using the license of the Corel software.
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      Now I know this is a big change for Corel. Traditionally, they have been opposed to policing how many times you installed the program on x number of computers. They seemed to be more concerned with the number of users than how many paid licenses they had. I can remember that for years you could buy the upgrade version and install it as a full version without ever needing to show a previous version as your proof of ownership. In all my years of buying software, I had never seen this before CorelDRAW. Well I guess Corel, like everyone else, is trying to clamp down and control who is using the program. Because of this, I am sure there are a number of users out there who will now probably take a closer look at whether or not they will upgrade.


Although Microsoft Publisher is often associated with newsletter and brochure design, that’s not the only things it’s good for. You can use the software to create a wide range of publications including proposals, product sheets, services guides and much, much more! Whatever type of publication you’re looking to design, you can guarantee that Microsoft Publisher will help you do it.
Thanks. I found this to be extremely helpful for some of those nagging annoyances in iD.  Unfortunately I have to use iD v3 at work.  All but #10 (& the part about changing the bg color in #1) were available as described.  Apparently #10 wasn’t an option until a later version – that would have been nice… but hey – I got a bunch of other awesome workable tips! 😀
But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.
If you are using a background, or if an image is near the edge of the page, you should add extra space around the outside. This outer margin is called "bleeding" and is very important because the cut is not always as accurate as expected. This additional margin helps the process of post-printing a lot. You can specify the size of the Bleed when you choose the size of the page. Double-click on the edge of the page, or go to Tools > Options > Document > Page Size. In the section "Bleed" you can set the desired distance (usually 3mm or 0.125"). In addition, you can make this area visible by selecting "Show bleed area".
A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
      Ok, I am no lawyer and do not want to be one. So pardon me if I miss a translation of a point with the TOS or EULA. I am not going to get into this in detail. If you are really concerned, then I suggest you type Terms of Service or EULA and CorelDRAW into Google. There are enough discussions on the web that relate to this topic to keep you going and to breed fire and brimstone in a few of you.
Leverage all the power you need to publish, share and output important technical documents, including a new capability to publish to WordPress. Using a diverse set of cross-media publishing and distribution capabilities, including CGM, WebCGM, SVG, PDF, and 3D PDF, you will ensure all of your important technical files will be delivered in a readable format and accessible through online, print and mobile options.
Capture your intended drawing shape with exactness using the Outline Position options that recognize line width measurements for object dimensions. Use Dynamic Guides so all elements of your technical illustration are intuitively placed in their intended positions with precision. Speed up the creation of all kinds of technical graphics incl. pipes and wires with the Parallel Drawing mode in Corel DESIGNER.
One thing I find a little odd is if you break apart a line into two or more segments they are still considered part of each other. In other words, once it is broken apart, if you select one of the new segments, it will select all of them. I ended up deleting the others and making new separate one. It isn't a big deal, just a little weird when you first encounter it.
Choose the XVL Studio 3D CAD add-on option to get animation tools and work with 3D CAD Engineering files. XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition adds native 3D CAD file format support to ensure support for assemblies and parts from 3D CAD systems, including CATIA, Inventor, PTC Creo, SolidWorks, NX as well as 3D CAD exchange file formats incl. STEP, JT, and others.

You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.
For the calendar project, you will need 12 pages -- one for each month of the year. You can create multiple pages by duplicating the first page (with all its layers). Before you do that, however, you can rename the layers on Page 1, so that when you duplicate the page and its layers, the names of the layers are duplicated on the other pages as well. For example, I have given the layers intuitive names that indicate the type of content that I will place on each layer: Dates, Advertisements, Logo&Month, and Back&Photos. When you have renamed the layers on the first page, duplicate the page by right-clicking the Page 1 tab at the bottom of the application window and choosing Duplicate Page from the pop-up menu. Since you haven't added any objects to the page yet, you can accept the default options in the Duplicate Page dialog box and click OK. Repeat this process to create all 12 pages of the calendar. You can now rename the pages with the corresponding names of the months (Figure 3).
If you have Office professional, it comes with MS Publisher. I use that for newsletters and flyers as it’s much easier to control where the text and photos appear. You’d still need to export it as a .pdf, otherwise most people wouldn’t be able to read it. And even if they had MS Publisher, they would still need to have the same fonts installed for it to look the same.

As far as figure or table numbering goes, the numbering needs to be done under the same list but on a different level. I use level 4 for my figures and level 5 for my tables. As an example, the figure style has this in the Number field: Figure^.^1-^#:^>. This renders any figure caption anywhere in the document correctly: Figure 3-7, Figure 5-2, Figure 1-11, depending only upon where in the text the style is applied. The ^. is a punctuation space. It’s slightly less than a regular space and keeps any cross-referenced figure instance from breaking over a line; so I’ll never see text like “…see Figure(line break)2-2 for a diagram of…” Also, the en space (^>) adds a nice distance between the figure number and the text explaining the figure.

When you add a new figure, and figure caption, make sure you anchor the text from the caption box to text inside your document (using blue anchor box on text frames) (if its not allready inline with the text frame…) and it will update the figure number…. unless you anchor it, it will just become the last number in the document. You will need to do this with all figures. Just anchor them and they will flow and update when needed! Hope this helps!
Acrobat’s PDF comment and review features are widely used for marking up documents, but there has always been a frustrating limitation: you couldn’t see those comments where you needed to most… on your InDesign page! (There have been some third-party add-ons that have helped with this, including the Annotations plug-in from DTP Tools.) Now, with CC 2019, you can import comments added in Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader as part of a review process, and the comments will show in the context of your InDesign layout (Figures 8 and 9). Even better, InDesign can now make some changes for you, including inserting or deleting text that has been marked in the PDF!
These limitations will drive some InDesign users crazy, but there is an easy solution, at least for the first two problems: to have separate footnote numbering for a table, and place the numbering under the table rather than at the bottom of the page (interspersed with other footnotes), simply place each table in a text frame of its own. Then, if necessary, you can anchor that text frame into the larger text story. That said, if the new features still don’t meet your needs, check out Peter Kahrel’s article “Going Deep with Footnotes” in InDesign Magazine issue #95.
The Adjust Layout feature can alter your page elements in several different ways, including resizing and moving frames. But it can also (optionally) alter the size of your text on the page. For example, if you’re converting a large A3 poster into a smaller A4 flyer, you probably want all your text to be half as large (and with half the leading). This is a pain to do manually, but it’s just a checkbox away with Adjust Layout (Figure 3).
Just wanted to post my thanks for this, had a verry similar issue at working using a clients custom fonts, installed them to a few machines. Same document, connected to same printers and same word settings, a number of extra pages would randomly been added to any documents using the fonts but revert back when moved to a good machine. Been searching for a week and done the same as above seems to have solved it!!!
There is an enhanced display of choices when browsing fonts in the Control, Character, and Properties panels font family menus. When you click the Font Family menu, there are two tabs at the top left (Figure 5): the “Fonts” tab shows currently installed or activated fonts. But here’s the cool one that is easy to overlook: The “Find More” tab previews Adobe Fonts that are available to be activated. Yes, that means instant access to thousands of fonts from within InDesign, without having to visit Adobe’s website.
As a final note, I also use this feature for my bibliography, which has about 230 references right now. (Thank goodness they finally added the capability to put text before the automatic number. InDesign CS2 is incapable of rendering an automatic list of bracketed numbers.) Anyway, the cross-referencing works great, but I run into the same problem that Dolati mentioned about having to manually change “Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4” to “Figs 2-3 and 2-4.” Changing the linked text does cause problems when you update the cross references. So, I set up a character style (invisible) that changes the text to white and changes the tracking so that the text doesn’t take up any horizontal space. That way, when I have a set of references like [5][6][7][12], I type [5-7,12] next to the references and apply the invisible character style to the linked references. Then, I don’t have to worry about the linked text giving me a warning that it needs to be updated. Also if the reference numbers change, I can (1) change the invisible character style so that I can see the text, (2) update the typed reference, and (3) put the invisible character style back how it was. This solution is far from ideal, but it works.
      Here is what Corel has to say about the Premium service: “Premium membership is an optional benefit that only X6 users can elect to purchase annually on top of their perpetual license (it’s automatically included for current subscribers). We offer our premium members early access to new features, exclusive content and upgrades to the next major version of CorelDRAW. In the past year, we have added over 20 new features that only premium members have access to.”

What's happens if we need several different names on our business cards? If they were only two, we could duplicate the page contents (Layout > Duplicate page), but if we want to create several pages, the best way is to create a Master Layer. To do this, select the logo and background, and choose Edit > Cut (or CTRL + X). Then, go to the Object Manager docker (Window > Dockers > Object Manager), and there choose from the docker menu "New Master Layer - All pages". Or we can click on the New Master Layer (all pages) icon at the bottom of the Object Manager docker.

- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
Another master layer is created for the names of the weekdays, which are also common to all pages. The sequential position of the background and the weekdays is different, which is why two master layers are needed. The weekdays layer is sixth from the bottom in the sequence of layers. This master layer must be placed on top of all layers (Figure 9).
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.
Ensure a consistent look, style, and layout throughout your design projects with Object Styles, Color Styles and Color Harmonies. With the enhanced Object Styles in Corel DESIGNER, you can manage object styles, such as outline color, line style, line width, halo, fill type and color, and text styles. You can then create symbol libraries that can be accessed and used across projects. Reuse the style definitions that you create once and apply to the individual components in the custom symbols.
The "Color mode" refers to the way in which we use the file, in this case, for high quality printing. The first choice is between RGB or CMYK color modes. RGB has brighter shades but is only good for web and desktop printers (for example inkjet printers) and plotters, but not for commercial printing. RGB has 16.8 million colors and CMYK only 64,000 but all commercial printers use CMYK. If you use a RGB color profile, the color mode will change when the file is sent to print, and perhaps the result will be bad or inaccurate. Then, you should choose CMYK as the "primary color mode" in both dialogues of Tools > Color Management.
People keep changing the subject before the question is answered.  I am having the same problem - I have used InDesign for many years and have not had this problem before - it is very unpleasant - especially on a deadline, and I can understand his frustration.  It ONLY happens when I use Paragraph Styles, not when clicking the Numbered List button.  I would forgo using the Paragraph Syles altogether when using the Numbering List, but sometimes I need to change the spacing, and I'd like it to look consistent.  I think I am going to have IT re-load InDesign.
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