When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.

Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
When you embed a series of images on a page, they typically look best when you align each image's left or right edge along the respective edge of the page. If you place them across the width of a document, they usually look best when their top or bottom edges are aligned. To align a series of images to the left or right down the page margin, click on the first image and then hold down the Shift key while clicking on each additional image until you’ve selected all of them. Next, click the Picture Tools tab on the Ribbon and click Format > Align > Align To Margin. Now click Format > Align > Align Left to align the images down the left margin, or Align Right to line them up down the right margin.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
And I'll get there by choosing the Page that I want to affect.…In this case Page 9 and I'll double-click on that, so I can actually jump to it.…I'm going to select that page and then go to the Pages panel menu and choose…Numbering & Section Options.…You're going to also find that under the Layout menu, there it is, Numbering…and Section Options.…When you choose that, it let's you change the Page Numbers for any page you have…selected in the Pages panel, Right now it's set to Automatic Page Numbering,…
In 2012 the joint LibreOffice/re-lab team implemented libcdr, a library for reading CDR files from version 7 to X3 and CMX files.[47] The library has extensive support for shapes and their properties, including support for color management and spot colors, and has a basic support for text.[48] The library provides a built-in converter to SVG, and a converter to OpenDocument is provided by writerperfect package. The libcdr library is used in LibreOffice starting from version 3.6,[49] and thanks to public API it can be freely used by other applications.
- [Voiceover] Hi and welcome to Publisher 2016 Essential Training, I'm David Rivers. If you need to lay out graphics-intensive documents that are specifically designed for publication, Publisher 2016 might be the right program for you. We'll begin with a tour of the new and improved user interface to get you comfortable in your environment, then it's onto the basics of creating publications from scratch. You can create your own graphical objects or insert existing objects like shapes, pictures, text boxes and WordArt, we'll also get into more complex functionality when we start customizing the layout and design of our publication, this will involve the use of master pages, backgrounds, templates and building blocks.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
Ha! Thank you Anne-Marie for confirming that this is the way to do it. To not be able to reference the current section number in a numbered paragraph style, when you can do it in a footer is so mind-bogglingly irrational. I’d already worked out the work-around you suggest, but fear that some of the chapters of the project I’m working on may need way too many duplicate sets of figure-reference styles for the solution to be at all elegant. As I’m only at the very start of what will be a two-year project I thought I’d hunt for a more logical solution – I’m amazed that this issue was discussed back in 2010 and that oh-so-simple section marker in paragraph numbering is still not available in December 2014! Maybe we all need to chip in a bit more to Adobe so they can add a few more of their “just do it” feature requests!
But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.

Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:
For the calendar project, you will need 12 pages -- one for each month of the year. You can create multiple pages by duplicating the first page (with all its layers). Before you do that, however, you can rename the layers on Page 1, so that when you duplicate the page and its layers, the names of the layers are duplicated on the other pages as well. For example, I have given the layers intuitive names that indicate the type of content that I will place on each layer: Dates, Advertisements, Logo&Month, and Back&Photos. When you have renamed the layers on the first page, duplicate the page by right-clicking the Page 1 tab at the bottom of the application window and choosing Duplicate Page from the pop-up menu. Since you haven't added any objects to the page yet, you can accept the default options in the Duplicate Page dialog box and click OK. Repeat this process to create all 12 pages of the calendar. You can now rename the pages with the corresponding names of the months (Figure 3).
Now, are you thinking to yourself, “I did change that once, but it didn’t stick…?” Even experienced users can get confused by which preferences are document-specific and which ones are application-specific. For help, read A Visual Guide to InDesign Preferences. In the meantime, anytime you find yourself irritated by the state of things in InDesign, take a trip to the Preferences dialog and see if you can change a setting to better suit you, your computer and your work.
For example, imagine that we start a job with 2 colors, Blue and Yellow. Instead of applying these colors to each individual object, it is better to create two Color Styles and apply these to the objects (to create a new color style, select the object and right-click and choose > Color Styles > New from Selected…), If you need to use shades of each color (such as 10% of Blue, 20%, 30%, etc) you can choose "Create Gradient" on the same Color Styles docker (Window > Dockers > Color Styles), or (CTRL+F6).
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Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
I also teach young people how to create good graphic design with coreldraw because i found this software to be an invaluable tool to make a living, it has really helped alot of businesses, companies and organizations to spread and advertise their products and generate more revenue for them selves in one way or another, to be frank with you, coreldraw is one of the best softwares i have ever seen in my life because of the wonders you can do with it, just try it out and see what i am talking about.
I have a document which was created in Word and has 226 pages. When I send it to a client who is using a later version of Word, it looks totally different and has over 330 pages. How can I send the client the document without it changing? Also, they wanted a pdf version, which looks nothing like the Word document. How can I get the Word document to look like the pdf?
The Classification filter (Figure 7) shows the same categories and icons that are found on the Typekit/Adobe Fonts website for filtering fonts. There are icons for each of eight classifications that were available in earlier InDesign versions, such as Serif, Script, and so on. You can also select properties for weight, width, x-height, contrast, standard or CAPS only, and Default Figure Style.
The problem we are having is that 2 computers in our house are viewing special characters differently. For my job we use the plus minus sign a lot. One one computer it works fine, the other computer it appears like an upside down A. They both have word 2003, they both have windows XP and they both use the same printer. So, what is causing this and is there a way to rectify the problem?
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Instead of giving you designs, it gives you options for sizes of paper.� Double clicking on one of the paper layout options, brings you to a blank document that is the size and shape you selected.� Using the tool bar to the left of the window, you can add shapes, text, and graphics to your document, wherever you choose, without the constraints of the templates.� Exploring the menus will give you a good idea of how to insert pictures, columns, and other helpful elements into your document.

To change the default, choose High Quality from the Default View menu in the Display Performance panel of Preferences. For good measure, I also unchecked Preserve Object Level Settings so that even graphics that are set to Fast or Typical (via Object > Display Performance) always display at High Quality. (But what about that big background graphic that is slowing you down? Put it on a layer and hide it. Don’t display it as a shadow of its former self.)

To create a running list—a list that is interrupted by other paragraphs or that spans multiple stories or documents—create a paragraph style and apply the style to paragraphs that you want to be part of the list. For example, to create a running list of the tables in your document, create a paragraph style called Tables, make a defined list part of the style, and then apply the Tables paragraph style to all paragraphs you want in your Table list.
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