This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."
A Vector and a Bitmap application are its main components but you also get a Font Manager, tons of clip-arts and assorted useful components such as to import and export all formats and it runs any plug-in you would use in PhotoShop, plus customised color pallets and native support for cmyk for most any kind of publishing you may want to create in it, as well as x-1A PDF export, editable presets or custom PDF settings as well.

Enjoy a more natural drawing experience and achieve more expressive results with the native support for Microsoft Surface, and advanced stylus support. Take advantage of pressure, bearing, tilt, and rotation when using the touch-up tools, painting and other brush tools within the applications. Experiment with rotation, flatness and elongation settings to control your brushstrokes in any given illustration.
      Well, there you have it. CorelDRAW has finally chosen to fall in with the rest of the software world and force users to be legal. This may seem a little harsh in tone, but this is really what they are doing. For some of you out there, the time has come for you to “pay the piper” if you choose to upgrade to a new version of CorelDRAW. To its credit, Corel will now be allowing multi-user discounts for those installs where there are a number of users. Is it right? Sorry, but yes it is. Most other software programs already have the same ELUA and TOS. Corel really is finally putting their proverbial foot down and saying, “We are going to control this in terms of each user having their own license.” If you are one of those people who buys one copy and installs it on ten computers in your office, then you will not be allowed to do this once you have upgraded to X6.1 or higher.
So, to create multi-level headings, you need to use the Level option just to the right of the List drop-down box. My second- and third-level headings use the same list as the first-level headings (this is necessary), except that they are changed to Level 2 and 3, respectively. Then, when numbering the section heading, you can insert the number of the previous-level heading above it. These can be selected using the arrow to the right of the Number field and selecting one of the levels under “Insert Number Placeholder.” So, the text in the Number field for my second-level heading is ^1.^#^t and it is ^1.^2.^#^t for the third-level heading. This presents the multi-level heading with dots between the numbers and a tab between the numbers and the section heading.
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.
There are a number of variables which may explain stability problems when running CorelDRAW on Windows XP 32\\64 bit, Windows Vista 32\\64 bit, and Windows 7 32\\64 bit operating systems. It is strongly advised that all operating system updates and CorelDRAW Graphics Suite X4\\X5 Service Packs be installed prior to troubleshootingapplication errors. It is also recommended that all system requirements are met prior to installing the application, since many older versions of CorelDRAW were never designed or tested to run on Windows Vista 32\\64 bit or Windows 7 32\\64 bit operating systems.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.
I have read up on the InDesign figures and cross referencing and have been testing this out. I am using separate text boxes for each figure description with the jump frames command. When I delete a figure the numbers automatically update and I can update the cross references. However, when I add a figure the numbers go out of sequence and I can’t work out how to update them. Perhaps there is another setting I need to change? Is there a way of numbering text boxes sequentially? I was able to thread boxes to update the numbers but this could lead to problems down the line…Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated.
Tip: Normally, the visibility and printability should be enabled or disabled together. Remember, a visible layer cannot be printed or exported if printability is disabled, and a non-visible layer can be printed and exported if printability is enabled. A layer that is visible but non-printable can be used to keep notes with the file. I use such a layer to keep the print details and other job information, so that I can refer to them at any time.

In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.

So, to create multi-level headings, you need to use the Level option just to the right of the List drop-down box. My second- and third-level headings use the same list as the first-level headings (this is necessary), except that they are changed to Level 2 and 3, respectively. Then, when numbering the section heading, you can insert the number of the previous-level heading above it. These can be selected using the arrow to the right of the Number field and selecting one of the levels under “Insert Number Placeholder.” So, the text in the Number field for my second-level heading is ^1.^#^t and it is ^1.^2.^#^t for the third-level heading. This presents the multi-level heading with dots between the numbers and a tab between the numbers and the section heading.
You could include things like empty spaces and paragraph breaks in your search if you know, for example, that the word that has to change is followed by a space. Insert these special characters by clicking the “@” arrow to the right of the Find box, or search for a particular glyph by going to the Glyph tab. Replacing glyphs one by one might be best, so that you can monitor your work and progress.
If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.
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