Cons: The basic disadvantage that I find is the same as it applies to any graphic software of vector character: you must have a computer equipped with a powerful and powerful processor that allows you to perform all the calculations necessary to design with this software, a task that becomes a lot slower to the extent that the number of data rises, as more elaborate designs are desired.
We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.
Pros: I love corel draw, working with it has been an amazing experience, it has truly set us apart in the fact that our presentations, documents and poster's quality has improved greatly, we always get compliments from our clients. There is a major difference when presenting for example a pie chart taken directly from excel that one vectorized with corel and our clients love it.
Therefore, if you send an image with 600 dpi or higher resolution, this will produce only slower and larger files but will not improve the resolution. Some people send images with 1800 dpi, 2400 dpi and more and this only creates much larger files, but does not increase the quality of the output. You'll see it better on screen if you zoom in on the image, but the printed result will be 300/400 dpi. Some people ask about inkjet printers that claim to print at 2400 dpi or more. There's a lot of confusion about this, since they use "dpi" (talking about printed dots per inch), which is the printing quality, not the resolution of the images. And, for large format printers (plotters), there is no need to use high resolution bitmaps ̶ on the contrary, the larger the size the lower the resolution needed. But, since they don't produce color separations and the printing process is totally different, the "300 dpi" standard is not applied to plotters, laser or inkjets.

If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
If activated, you likely see the Desktop Alert in the lower right-hand corner of your screen every time you receive an email, displaying a quick preview of the email. The intent is that regardless of the application you are in, you can quickly view the email by clicking on the Desktop Alert. However, for many of us, the Desktop Alert only proves to be a distraction from various tasks at hand.

To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
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