You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
Word Online automatically checks spelling as you type and applies a wavy red underline to misspelled text. Common AutoCorrect actions are included, such as correcting routine misspellings or converting characters to symbols. Additionally, you can set the proofing language or turn off the spelling checker for selected text. Learn more about differences between using a document in the browser and in Word.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
What's happens if we need several different names on our business cards? If they were only two, we could duplicate the page contents (Layout > Duplicate page), but if we want to create several pages, the best way is to create a Master Layer. To do this, select the logo and background, and choose Edit > Cut (or CTRL + X). Then, go to the Object Manager docker (Window > Dockers > Object Manager), and there choose from the docker menu "New Master Layer - All pages". Or we can click on the New Master Layer (all pages) icon at the bottom of the Object Manager docker.
Ha! Thank you Anne-Marie for confirming that this is the way to do it. To not be able to reference the current section number in a numbered paragraph style, when you can do it in a footer is so mind-bogglingly irrational. I’d already worked out the work-around you suggest, but fear that some of the chapters of the project I’m working on may need way too many duplicate sets of figure-reference styles for the solution to be at all elegant. As I’m only at the very start of what will be a two-year project I thought I’d hunt for a more logical solution – I’m amazed that this issue was discussed back in 2010 and that oh-so-simple section marker in paragraph numbering is still not available in December 2014! Maybe we all need to chip in a bit more to Adobe so they can add a few more of their “just do it” feature requests!
Overall: In 1997, when I was using a x486 PC, I did SO much with this program! I did dozens of flyers for my business, for more than 5 years. I designed and sent to press a video tape sleeve for a show we produced. I made all the chyrons for the TV show! We made PoP signs for the retail shop, we made files for banners and sent them to a sign maker.!
“I had wanted a Mac for a long time, for many reasons. I didn’t want to use a PC anymore, I wanted to try something different and the Mac is cool; so I got myself an iMac last month. In my free time, I do a lot of work in graphic design, image editing, and photography, and I’m a big fan of CorelDRAW. For those who are not familiar with this program, CorelDRAW is a popular graphics and image editing software program on Windows systems. It was one of the first applications that I installed on my PC in the 90s, so I now have a large number of files that I’ve created using this over the years.
Publisher's greatest weakness is its lack of graphic design tools. Where other desktop publishing packages let you craft logos or touch up photographs, Microsoft Publisher supports neither. Instead, it sticks to simpler effects such as 3D extrusions, bevels and basic quickshapes. If you're not experienced with any sort of image editing or graphic design, you might not miss those omissions, but the ability to smooth out a blemish or recolor a stock logo can make all the difference between a template and a personalized publication. If you want a program that offers more graphic design tools, you might be interested in Xara Page & Layout Designer.
If you do not want pdf, you can install the MS Office document image writer. Create document in word, excel etc, select print from file menu and change the default printer to the document image writer. It will give you an image of your document which will not change in different systems and can be viewed same as the original document by every one whom you forward it.
As it's one of the many programs that come with Microsoft Office, there is a good chance you already have Publisher on your computer. It's been included with higher-end copies of Office for almost 20 years, offered as a lightweight alternative to professional layout software such as Adobe InDesign. Though it's rarely used in a professional capacity, Publisher remains a surprisingly capable desktop publishing application. It sports excellent typography tools and one of the best template selections we've ever seen. It comes up somewhat short in the area of graphics editing support, but given its strengths, especially its usefulness in creating long-form publications, Microsoft Publisher remains a great option for at-home users, earning our Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award.
As a final note, I also use this feature for my bibliography, which has about 230 references right now. (Thank goodness they finally added the capability to put text before the automatic number. InDesign CS2 is incapable of rendering an automatic list of bracketed numbers.) Anyway, the cross-referencing works great, but I run into the same problem that Dolati mentioned about having to manually change “Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4” to “Figs 2-3 and 2-4.” Changing the linked text does cause problems when you update the cross references. So, I set up a character style (invisible) that changes the text to white and changes the tracking so that the text doesn’t take up any horizontal space. That way, when I have a set of references like [5][6][7][12], I type [5-7,12] next to the references and apply the invisible character style to the linked references. Then, I don’t have to worry about the linked text giving me a warning that it needs to be updated. Also if the reference numbers change, I can (1) change the invisible character style so that I can see the text, (2) update the typed reference, and (3) put the invisible character style back how it was. This solution is far from ideal, but it works.
Using an indexing shortcut, you can quickly index individual words, a phrase, or a list of words or phrases. Adobe InDesign recognizes two indexing shortcuts: one for standard index entries; the other for proper names. The proper name shortcut creates index entries by reversing the order of a name so it is alphabetized by the last name. In this way, you can list a name with the first name first, but have it appear in the index sorted by last name. For example, the name James Paul Carter would appear in the index as Carter, James Paul.
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