Keyboard shortcuts for kerning and tracking are awesome for quickly experimenting with type and for copyfitting. But InDesign’s default increment of 20/1000 ths of an em is HUGE. I knocked it down to 5 in the Kerning/Tracking field (Preferences > Units & Increments > Keyboard Increments). Maybe you love it—leave it alone. Maybe you think it’s too small—bump it up. The point is, you can make this setting work for you.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.
By default, every time you open an InDesign document, the links to graphics and text files are checked. If anything is amiss, you get an alert rather than an open document. This seems slow to me, especially because I often open documents only to edit them. In many cases, I don’t even have the graphic files, so of course they are missing. InDesign is spending time checking something I already know about—and forcing me to respond with Don’t Update Links.

Using Emoji fonts, you can include various colorful and graphical characters, such as smileys, flags, street signs, animals, people, food, and landmarks in your documents. Of course, you can’t just type an emoji inside InDesign, so to insert them, you can copy and paste them from another program, or double-click them inside the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs).

You create, edit, and preview the index using the Index panel (Window > Type & Tables > Index). The panel includes two modes: Reference and Topic. In Reference mode, the preview area displays complete index entries for the current document or book. In Topic mode, the preview area displays only topics, not page numbers or cross-references. Topic mode is used primarily for creating the index structure, whereas Reference mode is where you add your index entries.


Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.

You can see, it's not only about the Font name and size, there are a lot of text attributes that can be used in the same style, including colors. And you can have several color styles, i.e. for footnotes, headers, etc. Editing a style will change the entire document in just one step. Remember that as with Color Styles, it is necessary to apply the style to an object/objects, so that replacing or editing a style that uses Garamond will change all text objects that have had this style applied, not each and every Garamond text object.
You create, edit, and preview the index using the Index panel (Window > Type & Tables > Index). The panel includes two modes: Reference and Topic. In Reference mode, the preview area displays complete index entries for the current document or book. In Topic mode, the preview area displays only topics, not page numbers or cross-references. Topic mode is used primarily for creating the index structure, whereas Reference mode is where you add your index entries.
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