On the "Prepress" tab you have the option of activating "Bleed Limit". Even if the current document does not have an active bleed, you can activate it while creating the PDF. But remember that the objects must extend out from the page limit. Activating the "Bleed Limit" does not automatically increase the size of objects used to create the design. Another option which is often useful is to activate "Crop marks" to indicate the limits of our design. For this reason it is important that the page size is the real size.
Cons: Among the couple of problems I can state about this program remains in recommendation to the gradients, since when it is printed it does not work effectively, as if it had low levels. The filters for photos, since they do not deal with pictures with lots of information, they do not look extremely natural or lose the majority of the information when used.
After adding a few more facts, as shown in Figure F, you might notice something new—the two-digit numbers don't align with the previous one-digit numbers. You could leave the list as is, but most likely you'll want to adjust it. Leaving it as is makes the reader uncomfortable; it's simply not as readable as it should be. We expect numbers to align using the period character or the right-most digit if there's no punctuation.
Pros: Oh my, I have been using this program since 1997! Wow, I'm old! But the program has aged far better than I have, certainly. What's really remarkable is that despite all the years, the GUI is still intuitive and well laid out. It's also easier to 'ramp up from zero' (at least I think so, I'm sure I'm biased somehow having used it for so long) and get busy on real work.
Pros: CorelDRAW is a software that I started using years ago out of curiosity, the design caught my attention and I had the opportunity to learn the basics of the program and with basic saying I mean a great variety of applications, it is a complex program but I consider it very valuable to learn it to use. Despite not being an expert I have been able to develop designs that have complemented various activities, such as the design of the logo of the degree promotion. The quality offered by this program undoubtedly deserves recognition. Undoubtedly CorelDraw is synonymous with perfection

Cons: Among the couple of problems I can state about this program remains in recommendation to the gradients, since when it is printed it does not work effectively, as if it had low levels. The filters for photos, since they do not deal with pictures with lots of information, they do not look extremely natural or lose the majority of the information when used.
Workspace settings are used to save customization information in CorelDRAW. Custom toolbars, menus and shortcut keys are all saved to the workspace on exit. The next time CorelDRAW is launched, all customization from the previous session is restored. On occasion however, problems may develop with custom workspaces which affect the operation of CorelDRAW. It may be required that the workspace be reset in order to improve application performance. For information on how to reset the workspace in CorelDRAW, refer to Resetting Application Defaults in CorelDRAW® and PHOTO-PAINT® Running on Windows®
“These are the things I think of when I hear the word ‘typesetting’—they’re memories from my job at Seattle’s free rock and roll newspaper The Rocket, circa 1982. Desktop publishing didn’t exist yet, and digital (as opposed to photo) typesetting systems—with their WYSIWYG displays—were rare. The codes and characters I saw on my screen wouldn’t look anything like type until they were printed, one character at a time, on a strip of photographic film and developed. I could set just about any kind of type using that machine, provided the characters would fit on a piece of film not more than seven inches wide, and provided I didn’t need to use characters from more than six fonts.”
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
The easiest way to diagnose if a problem is file related is to try duplicating the problem with a new file. If the problem cannot be duplicated with a new document, the file at the source of the problems may be damaged or corrupt. In the event of a corrupt file which will no longer open in CorelDRAW, try importing the file into a new document. If this doesn't work, the file may be corrupt beyond repair and an attempt to open the backup should be made.
I first refered directly to the chapter 1-level paragraph style, but then got problems when a new chapter started on a right-page and not a left page, some picutures refered the previous chapter style. I then copied the chapter 1-paragraph style and made small text boxes with just the paragraph number on each page that starts a new chapter. I changed the text colour to no colour.
There it is. Page 2.…If I click inside there I can see it's actually…the word page and the number two.…So if I were to, for example, add additional pages…after page one these would labeled incorrectly…because there not using automatic page numbering.…So let's start by removing these by clicking the border,…and then hitting the Delete key on your keyboard.…
Cons: The one thing i can say that i didn't pretty much like with coreldraw is that it is somehow hard to learn, it takes a long time before you get use to the user interface and also the shortcut keys are not common unlike the Microsoft shortcut keys that are straight forward, but once you get use to the system, then sky is your limit because it's fun working with coreldraw and so many wonderful things can be done on it.

As far as figure or table numbering goes, the numbering needs to be done under the same list but on a different level. I use level 4 for my figures and level 5 for my tables. As an example, the figure style has this in the Number field: Figure^.^1-^#:^>. This renders any figure caption anywhere in the document correctly: Figure 3-7, Figure 5-2, Figure 1-11, depending only upon where in the text the style is applied. The ^. is a punctuation space. It’s slightly less than a regular space and keeps any cross-referenced figure instance from breaking over a line; so I’ll never see text like “…see Figure(line break)2-2 for a diagram of…” Also, the en space (^>) adds a nice distance between the figure number and the text explaining the figure.
Cons: Among the couple of problems I can state about this program remains in recommendation to the gradients, since when it is printed it does not work effectively, as if it had low levels. The filters for photos, since they do not deal with pictures with lots of information, they do not look extremely natural or lose the majority of the information when used.
Use the callout drawing tool in Corel DESIGNER to add interactive functionality to callout shapes in technical publications. With the Object Data Manager docker, you can list metadata fields, such as WebCGM metadata, for any graphical or callout shape. Object data items can be edited so that shapes can be manually edited as hotspots for WebCGM output.
Cut and copy work in a similar way. Highlighting a piece of text, right-clicking and selecting copy/cut will store the text in memory [memory: used to store data ]. The difference is copy leaves the highlighted text behind where as cut removes it. To insert the copied/cut text into a different area of the document, a different document, or an entirely different application altogether, right-click and select paste.
As a final note, I also use this feature for my bibliography, which has about 230 references right now. (Thank goodness they finally added the capability to put text before the automatic number. InDesign CS2 is incapable of rendering an automatic list of bracketed numbers.) Anyway, the cross-referencing works great, but I run into the same problem that Dolati mentioned about having to manually change “Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4” to “Figs 2-3 and 2-4.” Changing the linked text does cause problems when you update the cross references. So, I set up a character style (invisible) that changes the text to white and changes the tracking so that the text doesn’t take up any horizontal space. That way, when I have a set of references like [5][6][7][12], I type [5-7,12] next to the references and apply the invisible character style to the linked references. Then, I don’t have to worry about the linked text giving me a warning that it needs to be updated. Also if the reference numbers change, I can (1) change the invisible character style so that I can see the text, (2) update the typed reference, and (3) put the invisible character style back how it was. This solution is far from ideal, but it works.
I use cross-reference in my text which is works perfectly. but always I have had big problem when I wanted to put several Figures in parenthesis. simply I want to write for example (Figs 2-3 and 2-4) instead of Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). as you know I can delet Fig and write by hand Figs but as soon as I update the fields all the fig will come back and makes like (Figs Fig 2-3 and Fig 2-4). I hope some of you can help me to solve the problem
But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.
Sorry to hear it, but many thanks for the confirmation.  It will save me time looking for easier solutions.  I'll manually solve the problem this time, waiting until right before printing before I # the notes across docs manually, and think of a script if I continue to use InDesign after.  Still, I'm stunned that the coders have built in automatic page numbering, and yet not this.  Not much different for footnotes, as you suggest (check the final # of footnotes, increment by 1 and that is the # of the first footnote in the next doc), and as someone else mentioned. 
In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.
I am designing my first book on indesign for a client who wanted to turn an academic paper into a book therefore it has a lot of references in the footnotes. The format we are using is a super script number in the body text and end notes at the end of every chapter with a continuous numbering throughout the book.  I am importing text individually for every chapter but I have not managed to find a way to keep the footnote numbering continuous in this method. Also I am not very experienced in running scripts.
Two more I always change are Appearance of Black and File Handling. I set my global default to Display and Print Blacks Accurately (I still don’t know who would not want this changed), and I constantly change my File Handling Default Relink Folder from Original Link Folder to Most Recent Relink Folder depending on what I’m doing in the file. I also ditch all of the colors from the swatches palette and set my default paragraph style to reflect my most-used font, hyphenation, h&j, etc.
You can change all three settings, but they aren't on the Numbering option's dropdown, where you might expect them. To access these options, right-click the numbers (not the list) and choose Adjust List Indents from the resulting submenu, as shown in Figure C. In the resulting dialog, adjust the appropriate settings. For example, in Figure D, you can see that I've transposed the first two settings. Figure E shows the new settings in place. If the ruler is enabled, you can also see that the left tab the feature uses moved accordingly.
24 Aug 1995[12] 6 3, 4, 5, 6 5, 6 95 This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.
Just wanted to post my thanks for this, had a verry similar issue at working using a clients custom fonts, installed them to a few machines. Same document, connected to same printers and same word settings, a number of extra pages would randomly been added to any documents using the fonts but revert back when moved to a good machine. Been searching for a week and done the same as above seems to have solved it!!!

LibreOffice has supported Publisher's proprietary file format (.pub) since February 2013.[4] Corel Draw X4 features read-only support. Adobe PageMaker also saves files with a .pub extension, but the two files are incompatible and unrelated. Publisher supports numerous other file formats, including the Enhanced Metafile (EMF) format, which is supported on Windows platforms. The Microsoft Publisher trial version can be used to view .pub files beyond the trial period.[5]
What's happens if we need several different names on our business cards? If they were only two, we could duplicate the page contents (Layout > Duplicate page), but if we want to create several pages, the best way is to create a Master Layer. To do this, select the logo and background, and choose Edit > Cut (or CTRL + X). Then, go to the Object Manager docker (Window > Dockers > Object Manager), and there choose from the docker menu "New Master Layer - All pages". Or we can click on the New Master Layer (all pages) icon at the bottom of the Object Manager docker.
When you select terms like kanji for which a yomi is required and set the index marker using a shortcut, the New Page Reference dialog box will open automatically if the yomi has not been input, and the term selected will be displayed in the Topic Levels dialog box. Input the yomi corresponding to the text input in the Topic Levels box in the Yomi text box. When the same index entry appears on several pages, the yomi for all the index entries can be changed in a single step. To change only the index entry selected, select the page number in the Index panel and Page Reference Options from the Index panel menu.
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