As mentioned, you must have an account to get any updates now with version X6, which is different from earlier versions of CorelDRAW. In older versions, updating CorelDRAW with a service pack involved going to the Corel website and downloading the service pack. In more recent versions, the update could be done automatically via the Update command in the Help menu in the software. With Version 6.1, updates can only be done after you create an account with Corel and then log into the account via CorelDRAW.
Therefore, if you send an image with 600 dpi or higher resolution, this will produce only slower and larger files but will not improve the resolution. Some people send images with 1800 dpi, 2400 dpi and more and this only creates much larger files, but does not increase the quality of the output. You'll see it better on screen if you zoom in on the image, but the printed result will be 300/400 dpi. Some people ask about inkjet printers that claim to print at 2400 dpi or more. There's a lot of confusion about this, since they use "dpi" (talking about printed dots per inch), which is the printing quality, not the resolution of the images. And, for large format printers (plotters), there is no need to use high resolution bitmaps ̶ on the contrary, the larger the size the lower the resolution needed. But, since they don't produce color separations and the printing process is totally different, the "300 dpi" standard is not applied to plotters, laser or inkjets.
The easiest way to diagnose if a problem is file related is to try duplicating the problem with a new file. If the problem cannot be duplicated with a new document, the file at the source of the problems may be damaged or corrupt. In the event of a corrupt file which will no longer open in CorelDRAW, try importing the file into a new document. If this doesn't work, the file may be corrupt beyond repair and an attempt to open the backup should be made.

If you have Office professional, it comes with MS Publisher. I use that for newsletters and flyers as it’s much easier to control where the text and photos appear. You’d still need to export it as a .pdf, otherwise most people wouldn’t be able to read it. And even if they had MS Publisher, they would still need to have the same fonts installed for it to look the same.


There is an enhanced display of choices when browsing fonts in the Control, Character, and Properties panels font family menus. When you click the Font Family menu, there are two tabs at the top left (Figure 5): the “Fonts” tab shows currently installed or activated fonts. But here’s the cool one that is easy to overlook: The “Find More” tab previews Adobe Fonts that are available to be activated. Yes, that means instant access to thousands of fonts from within InDesign, without having to visit Adobe’s website.
      So essentially you now have the option to pay $99 per year and always have the latest version of the software for the term of your premium membership. For example, if you pay the $99 membership fee, you will automatically receive version X7 when it is released. Or you can just buy the latest version of the software and keep the standard account. You will miss out on the so-called extra online content which, hopefully, will evolve and provide more reasons to choose the premium service.
Add context to your technical projects by using 3D views and models in your technical illustrations. With XVL Studio Corel Edition, integrated with CorelDRAW Technical Suite 2018, you can create high-quality renderings from 3D views that are imported from DWG, 3DS, or IGES 3D model files. You can easily transform these 3D views into vector illustrations by using the enhanced “Send to Corel DESIGNER” feature.

Second (and more interesting) is that you can apply text formatting to text frames you’ve selected using the Selection tool or the Direct Selection tool. When you do this, InDesign applies the formatting to all of the text in the text frame, including any overset text. InDesign won’t let you use this method to apply formatting to text frames that are linked to other text frames. Tired of using the Type tool to select and format every photo caption on a page? Use the Selection tool to select them all and apply your formatting—it’s easier, and it’s quicker (see Figure 4-1).

Dear All, I have corel installed on two laptops. Both of these laptops have arabic support enabled via windows xp. I have been facing a very unusal problem, my problem is that one laptop writes digits in the Hindi numerical form (which are the digits that we use in the arabic writing), the other on doesnt, it only writes the Arabic numerical form (which are the digits used in the english langague). Both these computers have the same set of softwares on them. I have matched the settings for both on them in the control panel, and the font i use is the transparent arabic.
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.
The old (and buggy) Layout Adjustment feature found in previous versions of InDesign has now been retired. The Liquid Layout feature is still available, but few InDesign users take advantage of it. (Liquid Layouts provide a rule-based way of resizing pages. You can read about it in “Alternate Layouts” in InDesign Magazine issue #74.) Instead, the new Adjust Layout feature is easy to use and does a surprisingly good job of making changes to page items for you.
At one time, only professional graphic designers used desktop publishing software. Then along came consumer-level desktop publishing software and an explosion of people who did desktop publishing for fun and profit, with or without a background in traditional design. Today, desktop publishing is still a career choice for some, but it is also increasingly a required skill for a wide range of jobs and careers.
In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.
      For future installs and if you have updated with service packs, you now fall under the new terms of service and you need to get registered. Everything you do from now on is controlled by your new membership. This membership is created and locked to the e-mail account you use. So when you do register, make sure you use an e-mail address that you intend to keep and that you regularly receive e-mails with. Do not select a fake one or one you never use.
For my workflow, I decided to turn off Check Links Before Opening Document in the File Handling pane of the Preference dialog. Yes, sometimes I do have the imported files, but in those cases I don’t move the files. And I have to check the links before output anyway. Anything you can do to make opening documents more seamless is nice, so check out this preference and others in this area.
The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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