Pros: I've been using CorelDraw since version 3 back in 1993. CorelDraw combines the features of apps like Illustrator, Photoshop and Indesign in one intuitive and easy to use application. Need to design a vector ad that uses a few images? Edit the image and adjust resolution inside CorelDraw without having to first use another program like Photoshop. Need page layout for a multi-page project? Do it all in CorelDraw instead of having to build every page or ad separately and import into a separate application just for page layout. In addition to features that allowed us to use a single program rather than multiple, CorelDraw has an assortment of shortcuts that just make sense, and that Adobe hasn't bothered to include an easy way to accomplish in programs like Illustrator. Select the next object below or last below is a perfect example of this. With Illustrator a simple feature like this wasn't possible until CS5, while Corel had it for years before. All in all, CorelDraw's ease of use and flexibility saved me countless hours over the years.


Certain XP themes have been identified as cause operability problems with certain versions ofCorelDRAW. Furthermore, Visual Effects require resources in order to function correctly, which may have an adverse effect on applications installed on the system. Disable Themes and Visual Effects to determine if the problems persist. To disable themes, do the following:

A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.


The described numbering process is useful. I’m wondering what the Best Practice would be to ensure that the text frame containing the figure / section / chapter number remains locked to the figure that it refers to. A couple of attempts I’m tried haven’t been successful. Perhaps I’m not applying the technique properly or I’m unaware of another approach. Anyone have a suggestion or two?
The Capitalize dialog box provides a global solution for editing the capitalization of index entries so that you don’t have to edit entries one by one. For example, if you’ve indexed some of your entries as lowercase (cats) and others as uppercase (Cats), these entries will be considered separate topics. You can fix this problem by capitalizing selected entries.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.

Few people think this feature is handy. Yet many of us frequently work with tables given to us by clients. The one I run into most often is the Excel spreadsheet of price listings and item features, which I have to make presentable for a catalog or sales collateral. Many designers recreate these tables from scratch to make them clean and attractive, but this can be time-consuming, especially with large tables.

When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.

×