Another extremely useful feature for text-heavy documents is Find/Change. I don’t know about you, but in my experience, the longer the text, the greater the chance that the client will ask me to replace all occurrences of a certain phrase or title. When you have a fully laid-out 192-page book with footnotes, glossary and index, the task of manually replacing phrases is rather daunting.
You may know that Adobe uses voting on the InDesign Uservoice site to help determine which new features to add, and one of the top vote-getters has long been “Please make it possible to insert footnotes in tables.” Well, hallelujah: You can now include footnotes within tables. Plus, you can convert footnotes to endnotes and endnotes to footnotes in your document. And, also in the category of long document feature improvements, Adobe made a few small tweaks to the Index panel.
When you select terms like kanji for which a yomi is required and set the index marker using a shortcut, the New Page Reference dialog box will open automatically if the yomi has not been input, and the term selected will be displayed in the Topic Levels dialog box. Input the yomi corresponding to the text input in the Topic Levels box in the Yomi text box. When the same index entry appears on several pages, the yomi for all the index entries can be changed in a single step. To change only the index entry selected, select the page number in the Index panel and Page Reference Options from the Index panel menu.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.

Thanks. I found this to be extremely helpful for some of those nagging annoyances in iD.  Unfortunately I have to use iD v3 at work.  All but #10 (& the part about changing the bg color in #1) were available as described.  Apparently #10 wasn’t an option until a later version – that would have been nice… but hey – I got a bunch of other awesome workable tips! 😀


Choosing a CMYK color profile doesn't means that all objects will be CMYK automatically. When you import an image, or copy/paste a text, if the image is RGB it will be stored as RGB until you change the color mode. The best way is to use a image-editing software (such as Corel PHOTO-PAINT, included with the CorelDRAW Graphics Suite, or Corel PaintShop Pro), for correcting the image before importing it in to CorelDRAW. But if you insert an RGB image you can always change the color mode later. (NOTE: You can go to File > Document Properties… to make sure that all objects are in CMYK mode) For this reason it's so important to have a good color management.
20 Mar 2012[26] X6 (16) 7 to X6 7 to X6 XP (32-bit only), Vista, 7, 8 Includes 64-bit and multi-core processor native support, support for 64-bit Adobe Photoshop plugins, and additional tools to import and export from Adobe Creative Suite and Publisher. Object properties, styles, and color styling have each been consolidated into their own docking toolbars. A new Unicode OpenType-based text engine modernizes text handling, including full international language support (the legacy text mode is retained). Dynamic alignment guides allow for easy repositioning without setting static guidelines. CorelConnect content organizer allows for in-application access to online sources such as Flickr for assets such as images and clip art. New tools permit manipulating vector images by pushing, pulling, smearing, etc. Various improvements in frame-based layout, masking, clipping and effects have been made.[27]
The "Color mode" refers to the way in which we use the file, in this case, for high quality printing. The first choice is between RGB or CMYK color modes. RGB has brighter shades but is only good for web and desktop printers (for example inkjet printers) and plotters, but not for commercial printing. RGB has 16.8 million colors and CMYK only 64,000 but all commercial printers use CMYK. If you use a RGB color profile, the color mode will change when the file is sent to print, and perhaps the result will be bad or inaccurate. Then, you should choose CMYK as the "primary color mode" in both dialogues of Tools > Color Management.
Word and Publisher were designed to provide specific solutions for different requests. If your document requires footnotes, endnotes, annotations, tables of contents or page numbers, use Word to create the document. Publisher's ability to position text and graphics, handle pantone images and merge text and images makes it ideal for brochures and other creative documents. You will save time and effort if you choose the correct application for your tasks.
When you have a multiple-page document, such as a brochure or catalog, using master pages will save you time. Master pages are used to automatically insert layout elements on various pages. All elements of the master page are placed onto any page you choose, and these are by default not selectable, which allows you to further develop the page without worrying about accidentally modifying the pre-defined elements (such as page numbers, grids and guides, and graphic elements).
15 May 1992[6] 3 1, 2, 3 2, 3 3.0, 3.1 (preferred) Included Corel Photo-Paint asp ( for bitmap editing), CorelSHOW (for creating on-screen presentations), CorelCHART (for graphic charts), Mosaic and CorelTRACE (for vectorizing bitmaps). The inclusion of this software was the precedent for the actual graphic suites.[7] CorelDraw for Unix also became available.[8][9] The fonts bundled with CorelDraw are no longer in the proprietary Corel format WFN, but in Type 1 PostScript fonts and TTF TrueType formats.
Versions for Mac OS and Mac OS X were at one time available, but due to poor sales these were discontinued. The last port for Linux was version 9 (released in 2000, it did not run natively; instead, it used a modified version of Wine to run) and the last version for OS X was version 11 (released in 2001). Also, up until version 5, CorelDraw was developed for Windows 3.1x, CTOS and OS/2.
I am just in the process of having a website designed and when I view the website on my desktop it looks fine. Everything is aligned, pictures and tables where they are suppose to be, but when I look at it on my office computer or home laptop, it looks a mess with the tables all distorted and pictures smaller and overlapping. The programmer is telling me there is nothing she can do about that….this seems strange considering I see everyone elses websites and they look consistent. I’m thinking she doesn’t have the experience to do the website. I sent her a 22 page PowerPoint presentation to use for the web design layout, but I’m not sure of what software she is using to to convert the Powerpoint file to a website. Does anyone have any suggestions? I’m really concerned about how unprofessional the site is going to look,
You can change all three settings, but they aren't on the Numbering option's dropdown, where you might expect them. To access these options, right-click the numbers (not the list) and choose Adjust List Indents from the resulting submenu, as shown in Figure C. In the resulting dialog, adjust the appropriate settings. For example, in Figure D, you can see that I've transposed the first two settings. Figure E shows the new settings in place. If the ruler is enabled, you can also see that the left tab the feature uses moved accordingly.

Make the most of your content and important data by repurposing it from existing sources, including 3D designs with the integrated XVL Studio Corel Edition, and the optional XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition add-on for advanced 3D CAD assembly formats. You’ll benefit from full support for a variety of content exchange types including .DWG CAD files, and over 100 other data file formats, and the ability to instantly access content through Corel® CONNECT™.
      As mentioned, you must have an account to get any updates now with version X6, which is different from earlier versions of CorelDRAW. In older versions, updating CorelDRAW with a service pack involved going to the Corel website and downloading the service pack. In more recent versions, the update could be done automatically via the Update command in the Help menu in the software. With Version 6.1, updates can only be done after you create an account with Corel and then log into the account via CorelDRAW.

Therefore, if you send an image with 600 dpi or higher resolution, this will produce only slower and larger files but will not improve the resolution. Some people send images with 1800 dpi, 2400 dpi and more and this only creates much larger files, but does not increase the quality of the output. You'll see it better on screen if you zoom in on the image, but the printed result will be 300/400 dpi. Some people ask about inkjet printers that claim to print at 2400 dpi or more. There's a lot of confusion about this, since they use "dpi" (talking about printed dots per inch), which is the printing quality, not the resolution of the images. And, for large format printers (plotters), there is no need to use high resolution bitmaps ̶ on the contrary, the larger the size the lower the resolution needed. But, since they don't produce color separations and the printing process is totally different, the "300 dpi" standard is not applied to plotters, laser or inkjets.


Why would you need another panel for applying formatting to text or objects? Adobe has found that InDesign’s plethora of panels and dialog boxes can be confusing, especially for those who are new to InDesign, or who use it less frequently. So, following the lead of Illustrator CC and Photoshop CC, the new Properties panel shows many of the relevant layout commands. And while it doesn’t offer all the same features as the Control panel (which still exists), even if you are an experienced user you may find the Properties panel faster for some of your workflows because most of your needed commands are found in one place.
Thanks. I found this to be extremely helpful for some of those nagging annoyances in iD.  Unfortunately I have to use iD v3 at work.  All but #10 (& the part about changing the bg color in #1) were available as described.  Apparently #10 wasn’t an option until a later version – that would have been nice… but hey – I got a bunch of other awesome workable tips! 😀
15 May 1992[6] 3 1, 2, 3 2, 3 3.0, 3.1 (preferred) Included Corel Photo-Paint asp ( for bitmap editing), CorelSHOW (for creating on-screen presentations), CorelCHART (for graphic charts), Mosaic and CorelTRACE (for vectorizing bitmaps). The inclusion of this software was the precedent for the actual graphic suites.[7] CorelDraw for Unix also became available.[8][9] The fonts bundled with CorelDraw are no longer in the proprietary Corel format WFN, but in Type 1 PostScript fonts and TTF TrueType formats.
If you are using a background, or if an image is near the edge of the page, you should add extra space around the outside. This outer margin is called "bleeding" and is very important because the cut is not always as accurate as expected. This additional margin helps the process of post-printing a lot. You can specify the size of the Bleed when you choose the size of the page. Double-click on the edge of the page, or go to Tools > Options > Document > Page Size. In the section "Bleed" you can set the desired distance (usually 3mm or 0.125"). In addition, you can make this area visible by selecting "Show bleed area".
Guess what happened? It’s likely you accidentally hit a keyboard shortcut that toggles off this preference. Check Use Typographer’s Quotes again, then lock it down by changing the keyboard shortcut. (Do you really need to toggle this off? If you need foot and inch marks, just use those keyboard shortcuts: Command+’/Command+Shift+” or Ctrl+’/Ctrl+Shift+”.)
When you start working with the new Properties panel, you’ll likely find yourself frustrated because it’s just “version 1” and is a work in progress. For example, when you see an ellipsis (…) at the lower right of a section, clicking it expands the section to show additional choices. However, currently the collapsed or expanded state isn’t “sticky” between sessions, so it often closes even when you want it to stay open.
Cons: Among the couple of problems I can state about this program remains in recommendation to the gradients, since when it is printed it does not work effectively, as if it had low levels. The filters for photos, since they do not deal with pictures with lots of information, they do not look extremely natural or lose the majority of the information when used.
When you start working with the new Properties panel, you’ll likely find yourself frustrated because it’s just “version 1” and is a work in progress. For example, when you see an ellipsis (…) at the lower right of a section, clicking it expands the section to show additional choices. However, currently the collapsed or expanded state isn’t “sticky” between sessions, so it often closes even when you want it to stay open.
Anyway, there's a good alternative: create a PDF. To do this, you can go to File > Publish to PDF (or go to File > Export (CTRL+I), and there choose PDF). But it is not enough just to create a PDF, since not all the PDF's have the same configuration. For example, a PDF for the web will produce a PDF of low quality but it will be a small file, suitable for attaching to an email or using on a web page. But for printing, we need the opposite: images of high quality and resolution. PDF settings is also a topic that requires a lengthy explanation, but this excedes the scope of the current tutorial. There are many different configurations, according to each company's work flow. But we propose a simple format that should work with most of the job outputs: choose PDF X-3 in the PDF Presets drop-down list, then go to "Settings" and change the "Compatibility" to Acrobat 8.0 or higher. Why? Because the PDF X-3 is a good standard but it has a default compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, which does not support transparencies and lenses. This problem is solved by changing the compatibility.
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I love picas and points, and have used them almost exclusively since the early 90s (with QX, then InDesign). Of course, I use inches or cm for page sizes and such, but picas/points is just more convenient for fine-tuned positioning on the page. After all, there are almost 3 points in a single mm! I’d rather move something 1 pt than have to type .2 mm.
Another common mistake: be careful when enlarging or reducing the size of the images. If you import an image, for example 15x10 cm at 300 dpi, but want to enlarge it to 45x30 cm, the resolution decreases proportionally (in this example, it's going to 100 dpi), so the quality will be affected. On the contrary, if you reduce the image to 3x2 cm the resolution will increase proportionally (in this example, 1500 dpi). Both are bad, so you should be careful with the resolution. Remember, 300 dpi should be the resolution at real size, not before enlarging or reducing.
Using Emoji fonts, you can include various colorful and graphical characters, such as smileys, flags, street signs, animals, people, food, and landmarks in your documents. Of course, you can’t just type an emoji inside InDesign, so to insert them, you can copy and paste them from another program, or double-click them inside the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs).

Sending a Word (or any format document) doesn’t convert anything when it is send as an attachment. The most common culprit, from my experience, is when the document uses fonts which the receiver(s) don’t have on their computer. In that case a different similar font is used. Using only fonts which come preinstalled on all Windows versions will solve many (but not all) of the incompatibility problems. Unfortunately, this won’t work on a different OS such as MacOS or Linux. The best solution is to convert the document to .pdf and it should work on all machines.


InDesign can import many image formats (including JPEG, PNG, EPS, PICT, PDF, PSD and TIFF). If you are preparing a file for print, make sure the images are in an acceptable format. If you’re using a file format that allows for low-resolution settings, such as JPEG, check that the images have a resolution of 300 pixels per inch (PPI) and are saved in CMYK color mode.

People keep changing the subject before the question is answered.  I am having the same problem - I have used InDesign for many years and have not had this problem before - it is very unpleasant - especially on a deadline, and I can understand his frustration.  It ONLY happens when I use Paragraph Styles, not when clicking the Numbered List button.  I would forgo using the Paragraph Syles altogether when using the Numbering List, but sometimes I need to change the spacing, and I'd like it to look consistent.  I think I am going to have IT re-load InDesign.
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