You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
Acrobat’s PDF comment and review features are widely used for marking up documents, but there has always been a frustrating limitation: you couldn’t see those comments where you needed to most… on your InDesign page! (There have been some third-party add-ons that have helped with this, including the Annotations plug-in from DTP Tools.) Now, with CC 2019, you can import comments added in Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader as part of a review process, and the comments will show in the context of your InDesign layout (Figures 8 and 9). Even better, InDesign can now make some changes for you, including inserting or deleting text that has been marked in the PDF!

If you need to create documents with drop caps, pull quotes, columns, text that wraps around images, and similar desktop publishing elements, you can do so in Word. The only problem is that these tools are scattered all across Word’s Ribbon user interface, and some are buried deep in arcane menus. I'll show you where to find them, and explain how to make the most of them.

Anyway, there's a good alternative: create a PDF. To do this, you can go to File > Publish to PDF (or go to File > Export (CTRL+I), and there choose PDF). But it is not enough just to create a PDF, since not all the PDF's have the same configuration. For example, a PDF for the web will produce a PDF of low quality but it will be a small file, suitable for attaching to an email or using on a web page. But for printing, we need the opposite: images of high quality and resolution. PDF settings is also a topic that requires a lengthy explanation, but this excedes the scope of the current tutorial. There are many different configurations, according to each company's work flow. But we propose a simple format that should work with most of the job outputs: choose PDF X-3 in the PDF Presets drop-down list, then go to "Settings" and change the "Compatibility" to Acrobat 8.0 or higher. Why? Because the PDF X-3 is a good standard but it has a default compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, which does not support transparencies and lenses. This problem is solved by changing the compatibility.
Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:
I am editing a lengthy document (140 pages) in Spanish. At the beginning of the document I could right click on a word and get a list of synonyms and had the option in most cases of looking at a thesaurus as well. But as I progressed in the document, the synonym / thesaurus function stopped appearing as a option. I’m using MSOffice 2013. How can I get it back?
Guess what happened? It’s likely you accidentally hit a keyboard shortcut that toggles off this preference. Check Use Typographer’s Quotes again, then lock it down by changing the keyboard shortcut. (Do you really need to toggle this off? If you need foot and inch marks, just use those keyboard shortcuts: Command+’/Command+Shift+” or Ctrl+’/Ctrl+Shift+”.)

From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.
In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
×