Ha! Thank you Anne-Marie for confirming that this is the way to do it. To not be able to reference the current section number in a numbered paragraph style, when you can do it in a footer is so mind-bogglingly irrational. I’d already worked out the work-around you suggest, but fear that some of the chapters of the project I’m working on may need way too many duplicate sets of figure-reference styles for the solution to be at all elegant. As I’m only at the very start of what will be a two-year project I thought I’d hunt for a more logical solution – I’m amazed that this issue was discussed back in 2010 and that oh-so-simple section marker in paragraph numbering is still not available in December 2014! Maybe we all need to chip in a bit more to Adobe so they can add a few more of their “just do it” feature requests!

Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
      Well, there you have it. CorelDRAW has finally chosen to fall in with the rest of the software world and force users to be legal. This may seem a little harsh in tone, but this is really what they are doing. For some of you out there, the time has come for you to “pay the piper” if you choose to upgrade to a new version of CorelDRAW. To its credit, Corel will now be allowing multi-user discounts for those installs where there are a number of users. Is it right? Sorry, but yes it is. Most other software programs already have the same ELUA and TOS. Corel really is finally putting their proverbial foot down and saying, “We are going to control this in terms of each user having their own license.” If you are one of those people who buys one copy and installs it on ten computers in your office, then you will not be allowed to do this once you have upgraded to X6.1 or higher.
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If we want to work with columns, we can also determine the number of columns and distance between them in "Tools > Options > Workspace > Document > Guides > Presets > User Defined > Columns". An important detail is, not to be confused with Paragraph Text columns which involves splitting a block of text into two or more columns (Text menu > Columns…). Dividing the page into columns does not automatically separate the text or content ̶ it's just a visual reference.
First, add the image to your Word document, select the image, and choose Picture Tools on the Ribbon toolbar. Click Format > Wrap Text > Tight. Now, with the image still selected, click Format once more and choose Edit Wrap Points. A red line with black markers, called wrap points, will appear around the image. Adjust this line by dragging the wrap points: You can drag the wrap points inward to wrap text over the image, or drag them outward so that the text moves away from the image. Drag on the line itself to create additional wrap points, as desired. When you’re done, click away from the image, and the wrap points will disappear.
Create isometric or other parallel projected technical illustrations for assembly and maintenance instructions by dynamically drawing on a projected plane. Project your existing planar objects to a desired plane instead of manually calculating the skew angle and rotation. Obtain more precision and exactness with the UI controls in Corel DESIGNER®, as users can draw and edit shapes using accurate measurements in isometric and other projected drawing modes.

I first refered directly to the chapter 1-level paragraph style, but then got problems when a new chapter started on a right-page and not a left page, some picutures refered the previous chapter style. I then copied the chapter 1-paragraph style and made small text boxes with just the paragraph number on each page that starts a new chapter. I changed the text colour to no colour.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
From version X4 (14) on, the CDR file is a ZIP-compressed directory of several files, among them XML-files and the RIFF-structured riffdata.cdr with the familiar version signature in versions X4 (CDREvrsn) and X5 (CDRFvrsn), and a root.dat with CorelDraw X6, where the bytes 9 to 15 look slightly different -- "CDRGfver" in a file created with X6. "F" was the last valid hex digit, and the "fver" now indicates that the letter before does no longer stand for a hex digit.
If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.

Home Screen/Start workspace changes. The initial screen you see after launching InDesign is now called the Home screen, and it still appears as the Start Workspace. By default, it also appears any time that when no documents are open. You can turn it off by going to the General pane of the Preferences dialog box and turning off Show ‘Start’ Workspace When No Documents Are Open.
That’s not exactly correct. It prints correctly on one machine but not others. So it’s not the difference between the screen version and the print version. In most cases, it prints as it looks on the screen. Read the article you are commenting on for the reasons. From my experience, the most common reason is due to the different fonts installed on the machines. I once received a document to print and the layout was all wrong. I installed the missing fonts and it printed correctly.
Microsoft has a nice selection of support options, including helpful FAQs and tutorials on its website to forums on Facebook and other websites, you should be able to find answers to any questions you have. While email support is absent from Microsoft’s service, the company offers both telephone and live chat options. Live chat is one of the most convenient support options, providing answers to your questions in real time, and a rarity among desktop publishers.

23 Feb 2010[23] X5 (15) 7 to X5 7 to X5 XP, Vista, 7, 8 Built-in content organizer (CorelConnect), CD, web graphics and animation tools, multi-core performance improvement, digital content (professional fonts, clip arts, and photos), object hinting, pixel view, enhanced Mesh tool with transparency options, added touch support, and new supported file formats.[24] It has developed Transformation, which makes multiple copies of a single object.
Hello, I am having way too much trouble with Indesign to the point I just hate this program. I changed the visualization of the document in preferences like you said to high quality but the document which is from Illustrator still looks like crap when before it looked good. Also, the option in object that also says to change the visual quality is greyed out and I have no clue why aor how to change it. Getting desperate here, please help!

Lastly, please do not use the keyboard shortcuts in this article to achieve foot and inch marks. The true marks are in the Symbol font – or can be found in the “glyphs” palette. The other marks are prime and double prime; seasoned designers and typographers know the difference, just as they know the differences and uses between hyphens, en-dashes and em-dashes.
The problem we are having is that 2 computers in our house are viewing special characters differently. For my job we use the plus minus sign a lot. One one computer it works fine, the other computer it appears like an upside down A. They both have word 2003, they both have windows XP and they both use the same printer. So, what is causing this and is there a way to rectify the problem?

It's not good if the file is opened in a different version of the program because some things can change. For example, the fills of CorelDRAW X7 are quite different to those of previous versions and also allow selective transparency. For this reason, if you save the file back as a previous version, the program will ask if you want to convert text to curves and fills to bitmaps.
      When you create an account, you are asked to choose one of the two memberships: standard or premium. As a default, you are assigned a standard subscription. This allows you to access some online products along with some fonts. You will be informed of any updates that are available to be downloaded and those downloads will be applied if you choose.
Pros: I've been using CorelDraw since version 3 back in 1993. CorelDraw combines the features of apps like Illustrator, Photoshop and Indesign in one intuitive and easy to use application. Need to design a vector ad that uses a few images? Edit the image and adjust resolution inside CorelDraw without having to first use another program like Photoshop. Need page layout for a multi-page project? Do it all in CorelDraw instead of having to build every page or ad separately and import into a separate application just for page layout. In addition to features that allowed us to use a single program rather than multiple, CorelDraw has an assortment of shortcuts that just make sense, and that Adobe hasn't bothered to include an easy way to accomplish in programs like Illustrator. Select the next object below or last below is a perfect example of this. With Illustrator a simple feature like this wasn't possible until CS5, while Corel had it for years before. All in all, CorelDraw's ease of use and flexibility saved me countless hours over the years.

      To add some value to the premium membership, Corel has added in some new features that are not available in X6 or with the standard membership. These new features include: QR Codes; Validate Barcodes; Guideline Setups Docker; Alignment Setup Docker; The Camera Filter; Font Playground; and Color Styles. For more information about the subscription memberships visit this link: http://www.corel.com/static/product_content/cdgs/membership/CDGS_Membership_FAQs.pdf.

      Here is what Corel has to say about the Premium service: “Premium membership is an optional benefit that only X6 users can elect to purchase annually on top of their perpetual license (it’s automatically included for current subscribers). We offer our premium members early access to new features, exclusive content and upgrades to the next major version of CorelDRAW. In the past year, we have added over 20 new features that only premium members have access to.”
Add context to your technical projects by using 3D views and models in your technical illustrations. With XVL Studio Corel Edition, integrated with CorelDRAW Technical Suite 2018, you can create high-quality renderings from 3D views that are imported from DWG, 3DS, or IGES 3D model files. You can easily transform these 3D views into vector illustrations by using the enhanced “Send to Corel DESIGNER” feature.
Whatever the design, many times your client will ask for an alternate color scheme or additional options for fonts and text attributes. In other cases, you may want more options for your design. Spending time creating these options manually can add hours and additional costs to your project. Instead, why not use “Styles” in CorelDRAW? In this webinar, Anand Dixit, CorelDRAW Master, graphic designer and trainer will show you how to create options for your designs in minutes, including:
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
It's not good if the file is opened in a different version of the program because some things can change. For example, the fills of CorelDRAW X7 are quite different to those of previous versions and also allow selective transparency. For this reason, if you save the file back as a previous version, the program will ask if you want to convert text to curves and fills to bitmaps.

You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.

Hi David, i just figured this out, using CS6, if you place all your graphics and set up a figure number style, and place some of your styles in an inline text frame and the ones that need to fall outside the text frame, the numbering will be off, UNTIL you take the blue anchor frame and anchor it to text of the stand alone graphics, then the figure numbers will then be in order. It also works on 11×17 pages where you have to link the figure number to the previous page and then Anchor Object options and use the Inline or above Line (position) to move text frame to the next page. :-)
Produce illustrations that contain descriptive text, then output directly to the Translation Memory System (TMS), and process in Corel DESIGNER for translated results to use in multi-lingual global technical publication. Now, you can format text spanning multiple columns and use Corel DESIGNER to author complete user manuals or documents. Next, send the source language text for translation and receive translations to create localized documents literally with one click.
      For future installs and if you have updated with service packs, you now fall under the new terms of service and you need to get registered. Everything you do from now on is controlled by your new membership. This membership is created and locked to the e-mail account you use. So when you do register, make sure you use an e-mail address that you intend to keep and that you regularly receive e-mails with. Do not select a fake one or one you never use.
The Publications by Design has the templates grouped by design (e.g., Kidstuff, nature, etc.), and you have to scroll down to find the format you need (e.g., Newsletter, Web site, etc.).� This is the way to go if you have already decided on a particular design that you want to use across the board�for all of the types of documents you create.� All printed material (and even your Web site) will
Another preference that mimics Microsoft Word is Autocorrect. If you type in InDesign a lot, turning it on is worth a try. Check Enable Autocorrect in the Autocorrect panel of the Preferences dialog box. Tip: You can use Autocorrect as a poor man’s macro as well. For example, a recent project used the phrase “financial capabilities program” over and over. To speed up the typing of this tedious 30-character phrase, I added a new Autocorrect entry that automatically changed “fcp” to “financial capabilities program.”
Cons: The one area that CorelDRAW could use some help is in it's ability to create maps with real world measurements. For example: if I set the scale to 1" = 20', it would be nice if I could prompt a command to draw a line that is exactly 20' long. Instead, you have to manually draw the line and then measure to get it the correct length. Also, the layers feature in the Object Manager can be a bit troublesome but once you understand how it works it is okay.
People keep changing the subject before the question is answered.  I am having the same problem - I have used InDesign for many years and have not had this problem before - it is very unpleasant - especially on a deadline, and I can understand his frustration.  It ONLY happens when I use Paragraph Styles, not when clicking the Numbered List button.  I would forgo using the Paragraph Syles altogether when using the Numbering List, but sometimes I need to change the spacing, and I'd like it to look consistent.  I think I am going to have IT re-load InDesign.
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