Currently I’m struggling with figure numbering. I suppose there is some very easy solution to my problem and just have wasted too much time trying to find it myself. I use paragraph style for my figures, just the way you explained it. I don’t use cross-reference though. I don’t need it right now. I have similar problem as Giles. Every time I change an order of my figures, but within one, the same page, their order number doesn’t update and I don’t see any option neither to change it manually nor update it automatically. What am I missing?
Cons: Its old-school nature of user experience, however, means some of its features are kind of unintuitive to use for modern vector-handling, and also making it sometimes slow to work with. Since it is primarily confined to the Windows ecosystem also makes it difficult to work with files on another operating system unless you export it to another open standard for vectors. On top of that, the full price is far too much, considering Inkscape, being free, has a similar interface and can practically do 70% of what Corel can do. The subscription fee, while helpful, also isn't appealing, since professional illustrators would instead opt to get Affinity Designer instead.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
If you want you can rename this layer. Then simply "paste" (Edit > Paste or CTRL+V), to place the logos and background on the new layer. We can create as many pages as we need names, and all will have the same logo and background. But the advantage is, that it will only exist once in the file: and if you modify one element it will be changed on all pages. To avoid a change by mistake, we can "lock" that layer by clicking on the padlock icon on the Object Manager. Then, we just have to select the page and layer (usually, Layer 1), and enter the appropriate text (Name, Phone, etc)
Microsoft Publisher’s templates make publication design easy. If you need to create a quick publication with minimal effort, you can simply use one of Microsoft Publisher’s many templates. There are hundreds of easy-to-use templates to choose from, which are designed to simplify the layout and make creating your ideal publication quick and easy. If you can’t find the template you’re looking for, simply go online and you’re bound to find one you can download for free!
      So essentially you now have the option to pay $99 per year and always have the latest version of the software for the term of your premium membership. For example, if you pay the $99 membership fee, you will automatically receive version X7 when it is released. Or you can just buy the latest version of the software and keep the standard account. You will miss out on the so-called extra online content which, hopefully, will evolve and provide more reasons to choose the premium service.
Second (and more interesting) is that you can apply text formatting to text frames you’ve selected using the Selection tool or the Direct Selection tool. When you do this, InDesign applies the formatting to all of the text in the text frame, including any overset text. InDesign won’t let you use this method to apply formatting to text frames that are linked to other text frames. Tired of using the Type tool to select and format every photo caption on a page? Use the Selection tool to select them all and apply your formatting—it’s easier, and it’s quicker (see Figure 4-1).
When you generate the index, each topic is listed, along with the page on which it was found. The topics are sorted alphabetically, typically under section headings (A, B, C, and so on). An index entry consists of a topic (the term readers look up) paired with either a page reference (page number or range) or a cross-reference. A cross-reference, preceded by “See” or “See also,” points the reader to other entries in the index, rather than to a page number.
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