Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
As I mentioned above, you can now convert footnotes to endnotes and endnotes to footnotes in your document. To convert footnotes and endnotes, choose Type > Convert Footnote and Endnote. In the dialog box, you can specify whether you want to convert all the endnotes and footnotes in your document or only from the selection. Also, when importing Word or RTF files, there is now an option to place Word endnotes as static notes. Choosing static notes imports endnotes the way they were imported in InDesign CC 2017 before InDesign’s own endnote feature was introduced.
That’s not exactly correct. It prints correctly on one machine but not others. So it’s not the difference between the screen version and the print version. In most cases, it prints as it looks on the screen. Read the article you are commenting on for the reasons. From my experience, the most common reason is due to the different fonts installed on the machines. I once received a document to print and the layout was all wrong. I installed the missing fonts and it printed correctly.
I agree with Sherry, Matt, and Jack that measuring in picas is easier and more logical than measuring in inches. And it is not true that only people who worked in newspapers understand picas. Most if not all the InDesign books I’ve gone through use picas and points in their illustrations. You can move or adjust objects by a tenth of a point (0.1 pt) or three-tenths without using a calculator.
      It looks to me as though Corel, like most other software producers, is making strides to control the number of times a particular license is installed. Is it wrong? Based on other programs, no. Based on what Corel has done in the past, well, that is a bigger question. Admittedly, in the days of dwindling revenues and soaring costs, everyone is looking for ways to create additional cash flow from their operations and Corel is no different. I have always been an advocate of updating the programs and machinery that you make your money with. Let us hope that Corel makes it worth our while to do so. I do not mind updating as long as I find tools that I can use. If Corel continues to shy away from giving us reasons to upgrade (and by “us” I mean those of us in the engraving and awards industry), then maybe it is time to look elsewhere for a software solution.

However, note that just because you choose a font doesn’t mean your audience will see it. Fonts used for list or combo boxes are embedded (so the final viewer will definitely see them in the correct font). However, fonts you choose for text fields are not embedded in the PDF, and so the end user will only see the correct font if they’re using Adobe Acrobat or Reader and have those fonts active on their computer. If the fonts aren’t present, Acrobat and Reader will substitute Adobe Serif MM or Adobe Sans Serif MM.
To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
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