31 Aug 1999[15] 9 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 95, 98, NT 4 Mesh fill tool (for complex color filling), Artistic Media tool, Publish to PDF features, embedded ICC color profiles, Multiple On-screen Color Palettes and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications 6 support. The suite included Canto Cumulus LE, a piece of software for media management.
Word Online displays documents that are protected with Information Rights Management (IRM). However, these documents cannot be edited in the browser, and you cannot create IRM-protected documents in Word Online. Word Online can't open documents that are encrypted with a password. Advanced document protection features, such as creating IRM-protected documents and applying password-protection, are only available in the Word desktop app.
Microsoft's Word and Publisher tools are applications, which are sometimes used for similar tasks, including typing and editing text and placing, cropping, resizing and rotating images. Does this mean we have two MS Office tools serving the same purpose? No it doesn't, Word and Publisher were designed to provide solutions for specific types of documents and content. Therefore, you need to select which application is more relevant for your specific desktop publishing (DTP) requirements.
I first refered directly to the chapter 1-level paragraph style, but then got problems when a new chapter started on a right-page and not a left page, some picutures refered the previous chapter style. I then copied the chapter 1-paragraph style and made small text boxes with just the paragraph number on each page that starts a new chapter. I changed the text colour to no colour.
None of the provided options in the Bullets & Numbering / Numbers drop down list seem to do it. In the “Insert Number Placeholder” there is only a “Chapter Number” option in there. Is there a trick to make the “section prefix” show up somehow – it’s too logical for it not to be there – it must be hiding somewhere! Maybe you did that you reveal and I missed it!

In 2012 the joint LibreOffice/re-lab team implemented libcdr, a library for reading CDR files from version 7 to X3 and CMX files.[47] The library has extensive support for shapes and their properties, including support for color management and spot colors, and has a basic support for text.[48] The library provides a built-in converter to SVG, and a converter to OpenDocument is provided by writerperfect package. The libcdr library is used in LibreOffice starting from version 3.6,[49] and thanks to public API it can be freely used by other applications.

Have a customer that creates pricebooks for JohnDeer Dealers in excel then converts with acrobat & uploads them to a website. He got a virus forcing us to wipe and reload his PC. Reinstalled the same exact version of excel & everything else. But now when he opens his old excel files that he works in. The Fonts are tiny in some of his tables/cells. He has called me over and over again. I have told him to try decreasing his resolution or increasing the percentage size of items. & to check if some auto size font feature in excel is checked or unchecked. I am at a loss what else to tell him. I came across this website & The notion that maybe he used to have a special font that was lost in the wipe n reload. Is there a way to dissect one of his xls files to find out if they are calling for a font name we no longer have and it is being substituted for a different font by excel that is much smaller.
      As mentioned, you must have an account to get any updates now with version X6, which is different from earlier versions of CorelDRAW. In older versions, updating CorelDRAW with a service pack involved going to the Corel website and downloading the service pack. In more recent versions, the update could be done automatically via the Update command in the Help menu in the software. With Version 6.1, updates can only be done after you create an account with Corel and then log into the account via CorelDRAW.
Capture your intended drawing shape with exactness using the Outline Position options that recognize line width measurements for object dimensions. Use Dynamic Guides so all elements of your technical illustration are intuitively placed in their intended positions with precision. Speed up the creation of all kinds of technical graphics incl. pipes and wires with the Parallel Drawing mode in Corel DESIGNER.
Keyboard shortcuts for kerning and tracking are awesome for quickly experimenting with type and for copyfitting. But InDesign’s default increment of 20/1000 ths of an em is HUGE. I knocked it down to 5 in the Kerning/Tracking field (Preferences > Units & Increments > Keyboard Increments). Maybe you love it—leave it alone. Maybe you think it’s too small—bump it up. The point is, you can make this setting work for you.

However, note that just because you choose a font doesn’t mean your audience will see it. Fonts used for list or combo boxes are embedded (so the final viewer will definitely see them in the correct font). However, fonts you choose for text fields are not embedded in the PDF, and so the end user will only see the correct font if they’re using Adobe Acrobat or Reader and have those fonts active on their computer. If the fonts aren’t present, Acrobat and Reader will substitute Adobe Serif MM or Adobe Sans Serif MM.


Cons: Many years have passed since the last Corel 7, which was probably the most used design software. And the new Corel has been updated but without taking advantage of small processors (as does its competition). It is necessary to have a lot of machine potential to be able to work fluently. Maybe it's a software architecture problem, but they should include some accelerator or something that makes work in small workstations fluid.

20 Mar 2012[26] X6 (16) 7 to X6 7 to X6 XP (32-bit only), Vista, 7, 8 Includes 64-bit and multi-core processor native support, support for 64-bit Adobe Photoshop plugins, and additional tools to import and export from Adobe Creative Suite and Publisher. Object properties, styles, and color styling have each been consolidated into their own docking toolbars. A new Unicode OpenType-based text engine modernizes text handling, including full international language support (the legacy text mode is retained). Dynamic alignment guides allow for easy repositioning without setting static guidelines. CorelConnect content organizer allows for in-application access to online sources such as Flickr for assets such as images and clip art. New tools permit manipulating vector images by pushing, pulling, smearing, etc. Various improvements in frame-based layout, masking, clipping and effects have been made.[27]


But not all documents can use the CMYK color mode, because it requires 4 inks. If you create a file with only two or three colors (e.g. blue and yellow) perhaps it is best to use only two or three colors (Spot Colors), such as Pantone colors. In addition, not all colors can be printed using CMYK, e.g. "Gold", "Silver", etc. Some bright colors can only be achieved by using special inks, and these cannot be achieved with CMYK. Spot colors are also important for "non-printing objects" (for example, an outline to die cut) or "overprinted objects" (such as UV varnish). It's not only vectors that can use spot colors, also bitmaps can use Spot Colors. On the Bitmap Menu go to Mode > Duotone and convert the bitmap to one ("monotone"), or more spot colors.
      It looks to me as though Corel, like most other software producers, is making strides to control the number of times a particular license is installed. Is it wrong? Based on other programs, no. Based on what Corel has done in the past, well, that is a bigger question. Admittedly, in the days of dwindling revenues and soaring costs, everyone is looking for ways to create additional cash flow from their operations and Corel is no different. I have always been an advocate of updating the programs and machinery that you make your money with. Let us hope that Corel makes it worth our while to do so. I do not mind updating as long as I find tools that I can use. If Corel continues to shy away from giving us reasons to upgrade (and by “us” I mean those of us in the engraving and awards industry), then maybe it is time to look elsewhere for a software solution.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.

In this blog I will share a small, but great improvement Adobe introduced in InDesign CC 2017 for creating footnotes. When InDesign introduced footnotes, the process was to insert them into multi-column text frames and they were always placed in the same column where the footnote reference appeared. If you wanted a footnote across all the columns of the text frame, you had to do it manually.
The PSD image format deserves special mention. Being able to import PSD files into InDesign is extremely useful when working with elaborate graphics that have transparent or semi-transparent elements, especially if they are to be placed over colored backgrounds or textures. Another useful feature is the ability to turn the layers in a PSD file on and off directly in InDesign (i.e. without having to open Photoshop).
the tools are much better than the competition, it is easier to vectorize and edit vectors. when exporting I think it has the most extensive file support, plus I can even open Illustrator files (which I can not do vice versa) the cleaping mask option is better than another, I can edit even the bitmap colors a lot easier without worrying about damaging the original file
   When you purchase a software program, you are generally given a license to use that software. Typically, this license gives you the ability to install the software on one, two or three computers, depending on the terms of the license. When I talk about installing CorelDRAW on a computer or computers, I am talking about using the license of the Corel software.
Acrobat’s PDF comment and review features are widely used for marking up documents, but there has always been a frustrating limitation: you couldn’t see those comments where you needed to most… on your InDesign page! (There have been some third-party add-ons that have helped with this, including the Annotations plug-in from DTP Tools.) Now, with CC 2019, you can import comments added in Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader as part of a review process, and the comments will show in the context of your InDesign layout (Figures 8 and 9). Even better, InDesign can now make some changes for you, including inserting or deleting text that has been marked in the PDF!
Excellent stylus support (including the ability to adjust stylus tilt, bearing and rotation in real time). A quick editing workflow. Each node has a distinct appearance depending on the handle or selection type, and the size, colours and shapes of the editing points are customisable via Options. More intuitive interactive sliders for gradients, blends, transparency and so on wrap up a decent release. desktop numbering using indesign
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