InDesign is an essential tool for design firms, ad agencies, magazines, newspapers, book publishers, and freelance designers around the world. This course presents the core features and techniques that make this powerful page layout application fun and easy to use. Author David Blatner shows how to navigate and customize the workspace, manage documents and pages, work with text frames and graphics, export and print finished documents, explore creating interactive documents, and much more. He also covers popular topics such as EPUBs and long documents and includes advice on working with overset text, unnamed colors, and other troublesome issues that may arise for first-time designers.

Another possible solution if this is a document that has to be read by several or many people is to consider (remember we are talking about a 300 page document) creating a eBook format. Then the reader has some control over the format, or they can leave it alone. With a document this large, I would often load it onto a laptop, eReader, even a phone as the possibility of me being able to find the time to read it at one sitting without interruptions are very slim. This is not effective for all situations but I have found that when I am doing an intensive white paper, which might run into this many pages, the audience likes the ability to move it around to various device as they are reading. You can read PDF in a eReader, but by establishing it in LIT or ePub format then can comfortably read it on a phone, tablet, eReader, or laptop, as well as the main computer. Free programs like calibre will do the conversions for you, as well as be available to read it. On my android phone and tablet I use Aldiko which reads ePub, also free, and as an added bonus you can use the Calibre as a content server to download to you phone or tablet.


In Figure 4, I placed six raster images from my sample files using the “gridify” feature, producing a 2 × 3 grid of frames. When the Make Content-Aware Fit preference was turned off, the images were placed using the Fit Content Proportionally option (in Object > Fitting). When Make Content-Aware Fit is turned on by default, the feature did a pretty good job of finding the useful content to include within the frames. Of course, you can continue to tweak the image position manually in individual frames after using the fitting command.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Regarding the display settings, InDesign users who are still using CS6 or earlier will often take a serious performance hit by setting “Display Performance” to “High-Quality Display” if they have any high-res raster images or complex vector graphics. I assume that this is due to there not being a 64-bit version of InDesign before CC. Even if you have a high-end machine, 32-bit programs can’t utilize all of your system’s resources. And even with the 64-bit CC version, you’ll have performance issues if you use enough high-res/complex graphics in one document. Unlike Photoshop and Illustrator CC, InDesign has no option to use graphical hardware acceleration – i.e. it can’t use a dedicated graphics card, so all of the computations have to be run through the CPU; this too can bottleneck it’s performance.
Thanks. I found this to be extremely helpful for some of those nagging annoyances in iD.  Unfortunately I have to use iD v3 at work.  All but #10 (& the part about changing the bg color in #1) were available as described.  Apparently #10 wasn’t an option until a later version – that would have been nice… but hey – I got a bunch of other awesome workable tips! 😀
Multi-level numbering is quite easy, once you’ve figured out how to do it. I am using InDesign CS4 to write a technical dissertation, and it works great with my multi-level headings, such as “3.4.1 Partial Transient…”, and figures and tables throughout each section (or chapter). I do have the whole document in one file, but it’s not too large since the images are all linked.

Word is not designed for handling large document collaboration, which includes sending clients reports. As Leo has suggested, create the PDF of your report and send that your client. If they want changes, have them communicate them back and you make the necessary changes and then PDF the revised report again. It’s the only way that you can be absolutely certain that your client sees what you intended.

For the calendar project, you will need 12 pages -- one for each month of the year. You can create multiple pages by duplicating the first page (with all its layers). Before you do that, however, you can rename the layers on Page 1, so that when you duplicate the page and its layers, the names of the layers are duplicated on the other pages as well. For example, I have given the layers intuitive names that indicate the type of content that I will place on each layer: Dates, Advertisements, Logo&Month, and Back&Photos. When you have renamed the layers on the first page, duplicate the page by right-clicking the Page 1 tab at the bottom of the application window and choosing Duplicate Page from the pop-up menu. Since you haven't added any objects to the page yet, you can accept the default options in the Duplicate Page dialog box and click OK. Repeat this process to create all 12 pages of the calendar. You can now rename the pages with the corresponding names of the months (Figure 3).


To make the best use of the first few pages of a newsletter, you should start a long story on one page and finish it on a later page. That way, you can fit more stories on the front page, which is what your readers will see first. You can accomplish this by placing the story in linked text boxes, so that when the first text box is full, excess text will automatically flow into the second text box.

Content-Aware Fit is not enabled by default. If you want to make it apply automatically to all placed images, turn on “Make Content-Aware Fit the default frame fitting option” in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box. You may find some type of graphics work well with the algorithm and some may not, so you may need to experiment with the images used in your workflow. In my experience, the feature seems to work better with raster images than with vector graphics.
Choose the XVL Studio 3D CAD add-on option to get animation tools and work with 3D CAD Engineering files. XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition adds native 3D CAD file format support to ensure support for assemblies and parts from 3D CAD systems, including CATIA, Inventor, PTC Creo, SolidWorks, NX as well as 3D CAD exchange file formats incl. STEP, JT, and others.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
Eliminate the need to draw and project dimension objects in multiple steps thanks to the advanced dimension tools. Display precise measurement values in building plans and more, including radial and diameter dimensioning. Plus, with projected dimension options, your projected drawings can be quickly documented with precise and dynamic dimension lines and text.
Not working on Mac, but had the same issue on my PC (both in v.13 and 14). It disappeared after uninstalling CC Desktop Application after finishing ID installation (with Adobe uninstaller – https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/help/uninstall-creative-cloud-desktop-app.html) I’m not using CC Cloud so it’s not a problem for me, but I guess it will be a problem if somebody actually needs CC Desktop APP.

Versions for Mac OS and Mac OS X were at one time available, but due to poor sales these were discontinued. The last port for Linux was version 9 (released in 2000, it did not run natively; instead, it used a modified version of Wine to run) and the last version for OS X was version 11 (released in 2001). Also, up until version 5, CorelDraw was developed for Windows 3.1x, CTOS and OS/2.
We recently converted to Microsoft Windows XP and Microsoft 2007 applications. Subsequently, we received larger (24-inch) monitors. When using MS Word 2007, we made the dicovery that the on-screen view (and printed version) of a document page is not necessarily the same view (and printed version) that another user will see when viewing (or printing) the same page. For example, my page 19 may be another’s page 22. My layout looks great on-screen (and printed); another user’s layout (page endings, etc.) is different and not what we want. What is the source of this problem? How do we fix this so that we can ensure that what we see is what others will see when we distribute our documents?
InDesign is an essential tool for design firms, ad agencies, magazines, newspapers, book publishers, and freelance designers around the world. This course presents the core features and techniques that make this powerful page layout application fun and easy to use. Author David Blatner shows how to navigate and customize the workspace, manage documents and pages, work with text frames and graphics, export and print finished documents, explore creating interactive documents, and much more. He also covers popular topics such as EPUBs and long documents and includes advice on working with overset text, unnamed colors, and other troublesome issues that may arise for first-time designers.
try this…if you place all your graphics and set up a figure number style, and place some of your styles in an inline text frame and the ones that need to fall outside the text frame, the numbering will be off, UNTIL you take the blue anchor frame and anchor it to text of the stand alone graphics, then the figure numbers will then be in order. It also works on 11×17 pages where you have to link the figure number to the previous page and then Anchor Object options and use the Inline or above Line (position) to move text frame to the next page. :-)
Microsoft Publisher is an application that turns your computer into a desktop publishing center--allowing you and your students to create a number of professional looking documents. With Publisher, you can create a class newsletter, a flier for an upcoming fundraiser, invitations for a class function, or informational brochures on any number of topics.

The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
InDesign CC makes a lot of assumptions about you. For example, it’s pretty sure that your world view is pretty Dark. It thinks you understand picas. And it’s pretty sure that you don’t want to take advantage of that gorgeous display your monitor offers. I can’t tell you why it makes these assumptions—but I can tell you where to change them if they’re not working for you. So if you’ve never customized your InDesign preferences, just press Command+K (Mac) or Ctrl+K (Windows) to open the dialog box and follow along.
I am just in the process of having a website designed and when I view the website on my desktop it looks fine. Everything is aligned, pictures and tables where they are suppose to be, but when I look at it on my office computer or home laptop, it looks a mess with the tables all distorted and pictures smaller and overlapping. The programmer is telling me there is nothing she can do about that….this seems strange considering I see everyone elses websites and they look consistent. I’m thinking she doesn’t have the experience to do the website. I sent her a 22 page PowerPoint presentation to use for the web design layout, but I’m not sure of what software she is using to to convert the Powerpoint file to a website. Does anyone have any suggestions? I’m really concerned about how unprofessional the site is going to look,
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
If we send the file to Print (File > Print or CTRL+P), notice that one card per sheet appears. But if we go to File > Print Preview, we can perform an Imposition (the second tool on the left), as well as set the gutter distance between the cards. Replays can be identical or different, why we chose it as the page number. We can also add Crop Marks (third tool), and many other options.

Sorry to hear it, but many thanks for the confirmation.  It will save me time looking for easier solutions.  I'll manually solve the problem this time, waiting until right before printing before I # the notes across docs manually, and think of a script if I continue to use InDesign after.  Still, I'm stunned that the coders have built in automatic page numbering, and yet not this.  Not much different for footnotes, as you suggest (check the final # of footnotes, increment by 1 and that is the # of the first footnote in the next doc), and as someone else mentioned. 
Another preference that mimics Microsoft Word is Autocorrect. If you type in InDesign a lot, turning it on is worth a try. Check Enable Autocorrect in the Autocorrect panel of the Preferences dialog box. Tip: You can use Autocorrect as a poor man’s macro as well. For example, a recent project used the phrase “financial capabilities program” over and over. To speed up the typing of this tedious 30-character phrase, I added a new Autocorrect entry that automatically changed “fcp” to “financial capabilities program.”
      Now I know this is a big change for Corel. Traditionally, they have been opposed to policing how many times you installed the program on x number of computers. They seemed to be more concerned with the number of users than how many paid licenses they had. I can remember that for years you could buy the upgrade version and install it as a full version without ever needing to show a previous version as your proof of ownership. In all my years of buying software, I had never seen this before CorelDRAW. Well I guess Corel, like everyone else, is trying to clamp down and control who is using the program. Because of this, I am sure there are a number of users out there who will now probably take a closer look at whether or not they will upgrade.

The easiest way to implement a numbering scheme for headings is to add one to a heading style. To illustrate, we'll modify Heading 1 by adding a numbering scheme. First, right-click Heading 1 in the Styles gallery (in the Styles group on the Home tab). Then, choose Modify as shown in Figure A to launch the Modify Style dialog. If you thumb through the default properties, you'll not find a numbering scheme (Figure B). Click the Format button and choose Numbering as shown in Figure B. If necessary, click the Numbering tab. Choose the predefined scheme that's the best match for what you want (Figure C).


After adding a few more facts, as shown in Figure F, you might notice something new—the two-digit numbers don't align with the previous one-digit numbers. You could leave the list as is, but most likely you'll want to adjust it. Leaving it as is makes the reader uncomfortable; it's simply not as readable as it should be. We expect numbers to align using the period character or the right-most digit if there's no punctuation.
   If you are a shop that relies on one version of CorelDRAW and it is installed on multiple computers, you may be in for a surprise and added expense if you update to a service pack 6.1 or higher, or if you decide that when a new version of CorelDRAW comes out, you want to upgrade and install one license on a number of computers. For example, if you usually have four people working at the same time on their own computers, then each version on each computer will require its own license. I know that a lot of shops have the same version of CorelDRAW on multiple computers. So, when upgrade time comes you could be in for a significantly higher cost.
I agree with Sherry, Matt, and Jack that measuring in picas is easier and more logical than measuring in inches. And it is not true that only people who worked in newspapers understand picas. Most if not all the InDesign books I’ve gone through use picas and points in their illustrations. You can move or adjust objects by a tenth of a point (0.1 pt) or three-tenths without using a calculator.
Pros: The best thing about CorelDRAW is the versatility it offers when undertaking a design project as well as the variety of formats with which it is compatible. Other programs do not allow working in PDF or PSD formats, for example. This problem was solved with CorelDRAW. In the same way, the measurement systems used by the program are very intuitive, which undoubtedly facilitates the work, saving time.

More than one person can work simultaneously in a document. In Word Online and Word 2016, real-time presence helps you see where your co-authors are working in the document so that you don't create conflicts as you edit, and you can see changes as they're being made. Word 2013 supports simultaneous editing, but there is no presence indication, and changes can't be seen by multiple authors until the document is saved. To learn more about real-time co-authoring, see What's new in Word Online and Collaborate on Word documents with real-time co-authoring.

Create macros and add-ins with the integrated Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for Applications (VSTA) and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). With the enhanced automation interface, developers can create utilities and macros that can interact with the drawing page. Using the new classes and methods, you can now create even more powerful utilities and macros to enhance the applications in CorelDRAW Technical Suite.
Cons: The one area that CorelDRAW could use some help is in it's ability to create maps with real world measurements. For example: if I set the scale to 1" = 20', it would be nice if I could prompt a command to draw a line that is exactly 20' long. Instead, you have to manually draw the line and then measure to get it the correct length. Also, the layers feature in the Object Manager can be a bit troublesome but once you understand how it works it is okay.

Word's numbered list feature is easy to use but modifying the results isn't always as intuitive as you might like. As is often the case with Office, knowing the right setting to use and where to find it is the key. In this article, we'll take a basic look at Word's numbering feature and then move on to two common problems—indents and alignment—that are easy to solve if you know where to look and how to alter the setting to get the results you want.
This is part of the Page Setup, but it's an important step. After defining the page size, you should choose the inside and outside page margins. Inside margins, because it's not good to place text or objects near the edge of page ̶ it's not just about the aesthetics or design visuals ̶ even if there is little difference when cutting and it's not noticeable that there is a margin around the inside.

You can change all three settings, but they aren't on the Numbering option's dropdown, where you might expect them. To access these options, right-click the numbers (not the list) and choose Adjust List Indents from the resulting submenu, as shown in Figure C. In the resulting dialog, adjust the appropriate settings. For example, in Figure D, you can see that I've transposed the first two settings. Figure E shows the new settings in place. If the ruler is enabled, you can also see that the left tab the feature uses moved accordingly.
When you're working on a document such as a magazine or a book with many pages in it, using the master page feature in Adobe InDesign CC 2015 to insert automatic page numbering simplifies working with the document. On a master page, you designate the position, font, and size of the page numbers and any additional text you want to accompany the numbers such as the magazine name, date or the word "Page." Then that information appears on every page of the document along with the correct page number. As you work, you can add and remove pages or rearrange entire sections, and the numbers remain accurate.
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