Choose from a variety of workspaces designed for different proficiency levels and specific tasks: Page Layout and Illustration, a Classic option for longtime users, a Lite option for new users, Technical Illustration for pros doing isometric illustrations, Diagramming for pros using flowcharts and diagrams, and workspaces with the look and feel of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.
      When you install the update or service pack, you are prompted to log in or create an account. Figure 1 shows the log in screen that you are presented with when you install CorelDRAW or a new update. You do not have to create an account but if you don’t, you will not receive updates to your software. For this reason, you really do need to create an account. To create an account, click on the blue “Create an Account” button.
If you are sending the original .CDR file, you must provide all the required information. The best way to do this is to go to File > Collect for Output…, which creates a new folder with a copy of the .CDR file, the fonts used and the color profile. If you are using externally linked images, these files will be also be included. Optionally, you can also create a PDF.
The same happens with the styles of text and graphics. Suppose that we are working on a magazine, and we use Garamond, 24 pts for titles and Times New Roman, 11 pts for the body of the text. But after we have finished, our customer wants to change the fonts, and asks us to use Humanist777 - 30 pts for the titles and HelveticaNeue LT Pro 55 Roman - 12 pts for the body of the text. Although you can change it manually if we edit the Style of the titles it will change on all the pages in a second.
      Again, as I have mentioned in numerous articles about CorelDRAW, the bottom line is: Is it worth the upgrade? Is it worth it to pay significantly more money to get the latest version? I think some of you will definitely need to think harder about that. As some of you are aware, I am not a big fan of how the recognition and identification industry has to take a back seat in terms of features that Corel makes available. Maybe this will change with the new policy but then again, maybe not. If everyone has to pay, then maybe they will finally bring some specific features to our industry that we need to make our workflow a lot easier and more efficient.

Provides me every feature I need to create impressive ,quality drawings. It has particularly been useful when I need to create logos or any other vector based drawings. I leverage on Corels SHAPE TOOL to correct any errors and shortcomings in my drawings using nodes. I also like Corels text tool for their typographic quality , allowing me play around with texts..
LibreOffice has supported Publisher's proprietary file format (.pub) since February 2013.[4] Corel Draw X4 features read-only support. Adobe PageMaker also saves files with a .pub extension, but the two files are incompatible and unrelated. Publisher supports numerous other file formats, including the Enhanced Metafile (EMF) format, which is supported on Windows platforms. The Microsoft Publisher trial version can be used to view .pub files beyond the trial period.[5]
I love picas and points, and have used them almost exclusively since the early 90s (with QX, then InDesign). Of course, I use inches or cm for page sizes and such, but picas/points is just more convenient for fine-tuned positioning on the page. After all, there are almost 3 points in a single mm! I’d rather move something 1 pt than have to type .2 mm.
I also teach young people how to create good graphic design with coreldraw because i found this software to be an invaluable tool to make a living, it has really helped alot of businesses, companies and organizations to spread and advertise their products and generate more revenue for them selves in one way or another, to be frank with you, coreldraw is one of the best softwares i have ever seen in my life because of the wonders you can do with it, just try it out and see what i am talking about.
As far as figure or table numbering goes, the numbering needs to be done under the same list but on a different level. I use level 4 for my figures and level 5 for my tables. As an example, the figure style has this in the Number field: Figure^.^1-^#:^>. This renders any figure caption anywhere in the document correctly: Figure 3-7, Figure 5-2, Figure 1-11, depending only upon where in the text the style is applied. The ^. is a punctuation space. It’s slightly less than a regular space and keeps any cross-referenced figure instance from breaking over a line; so I’ll never see text like “…see Figure(line break)2-2 for a diagram of…” Also, the en space (^>) adds a nice distance between the figure number and the text explaining the figure.

To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
×