You can change all three settings, but they aren't on the Numbering option's dropdown, where you might expect them. To access these options, right-click the numbers (not the list) and choose Adjust List Indents from the resulting submenu, as shown in Figure C. In the resulting dialog, adjust the appropriate settings. For example, in Figure D, you can see that I've transposed the first two settings. Figure E shows the new settings in place. If the ruler is enabled, you can also see that the left tab the feature uses moved accordingly.

If you use the same page size and language for most of your documents, you can change these defaults with no document open. For example, to change the default page size, close all documents, choose File > Document Setup, and select a desired page size. To set a default dictionary, close all documents, choose Edit > Preferences > Dictionary (Windows) or InDesign > Preferences > Dictionary (Mac OS), and select an option from the Language menu.
I have found that even the same letter fonts within word vary from installation to installation. If you want to establish a estandar in portable documents definetely use PDF but if you MUST MUST be able to see a word document exactly as it is seen in another computer (because you have put a lot of work already fixing it and its too long) what you can do is in the original computer where the the documents looks right, go to c:/windows/fonts then copy all fonts and paste them to a pendrive. then go to the computer where the document is not been seen right and install all fonts anew. It will say that some fonts are already installed, its ok if you do not install them and install everything else. This way you ensure that every font used in the original computer is also in the other one and no sustitue is being used. Good luck!
Therefore, if you send an image with 600 dpi or higher resolution, this will produce only slower and larger files but will not improve the resolution. Some people send images with 1800 dpi, 2400 dpi and more and this only creates much larger files, but does not increase the quality of the output. You'll see it better on screen if you zoom in on the image, but the printed result will be 300/400 dpi. Some people ask about inkjet printers that claim to print at 2400 dpi or more. There's a lot of confusion about this, since they use "dpi" (talking about printed dots per inch), which is the printing quality, not the resolution of the images. And, for large format printers (plotters), there is no need to use high resolution bitmaps ̶ on the contrary, the larger the size the lower the resolution needed. But, since they don't produce color separations and the printing process is totally different, the "300 dpi" standard is not applied to plotters, laser or inkjets.

If you have Office professional, it comes with MS Publisher. I use that for newsletters and flyers as it’s much easier to control where the text and photos appear. You’d still need to export it as a .pdf, otherwise most people wouldn’t be able to read it. And even if they had MS Publisher, they would still need to have the same fonts installed for it to look the same.


On the "Objects" tab you had several important options. The standard PDF X-3 is good, so you don't need to change anything. In particular, it's not needed to convert text to curves, because the PDF will embed all the fonts. Use this option only if you use fonts with restrictions for print, but only a few fonts have this problem. The 'Convert to curves' option will create a bigger and more complex file, and some RIPs will have problems processing it. Since the fonts will be embedded, it is not necessary to convert text to curves.
If you do not want pdf, you can install the MS Office document image writer. Create document in word, excel etc, select print from file menu and change the default printer to the document image writer. It will give you an image of your document which will not change in different systems and can be viewed same as the original document by every one whom you forward it.
Make the most of your content and important data by repurposing it from existing sources, including 3D designs with the integrated XVL Studio Corel Edition, and the optional XVL Studio 3D CAD Corel Edition add-on for advanced 3D CAD assembly formats. You’ll benefit from full support for a variety of content exchange types including .DWG CAD files, and over 100 other data file formats, and the ability to instantly access content through Corel® CONNECT™.
Choose the figure number paragraph style in the list on the left, and the specific figure you’re pointing at in the list on the right. Then set the Format to Paragraph Number — after all, there’s no text in the paragraph; you just want its “number.” Don’t forget to set Appearance to Invisible so that you don’t have incredibly ugly black rectangles all over your document.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.

The text frame is fairly self-explanatory. After creating the shape for a text frame (typically a rectangle, but it could be a circle or a custom shape drawn with the Pen tool), you have two options: either type directly in the frame or import content from another document. To import, go to the File menu and choose Place (or use the shortcut: Command + D on a Mac and Control + D on Windows).
Making an index in InDesign has always been hard, but here are two little changes that help: first, the size of the New Cross-Reference field in the Index panel has been enlarged, providing more space to find and locate index entries. Second, there’s now a Find field in the same dialog box to search within the index entries. Simply type the search term in the field, and use the Find Next Entry and Find Previous Entry buttons (arrows) to view the index entries.
Use "Format Page Numbers" for specific changes, like types of numbers and chapter headings. If you want to go the extra mile, double-click on the header or footer once again. Click "Page Numbers," then click "Format Page Numbers" under the menu that appears. From here, you can set different types of numbers, like Roman numerals or letters, as well as customize the basic appearance of numbers. It is not incredibly robust, but it works.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.
15 May 1992[6] 3 1, 2, 3 2, 3 3.0, 3.1 (preferred) Included Corel Photo-Paint asp ( for bitmap editing), CorelSHOW (for creating on-screen presentations), CorelCHART (for graphic charts), Mosaic and CorelTRACE (for vectorizing bitmaps). The inclusion of this software was the precedent for the actual graphic suites.[7] CorelDraw for Unix also became available.[8][9] The fonts bundled with CorelDraw are no longer in the proprietary Corel format WFN, but in Type 1 PostScript fonts and TTF TrueType formats.
If you are using a background, or if an image is near the edge of the page, you should add extra space around the outside. This outer margin is called "bleeding" and is very important because the cut is not always as accurate as expected. This additional margin helps the process of post-printing a lot. You can specify the size of the Bleed when you choose the size of the page. Double-click on the edge of the page, or go to Tools > Options > Document > Page Size. In the section "Bleed" you can set the desired distance (usually 3mm or 0.125"). In addition, you can make this area visible by selecting "Show bleed area".

First, create the text boxes by clicking the Insert tab on the Ribbon, clicking Text Box > Draw Text Box, and then dragging your mouse to draw a text box on the page. Repeat this step to create a second text box on a later page. Next, select the first text box and click Drawing Tools > Format > Create Link. The cursor will change to resemble a jug with a down-pointing arrow in it. Position the cursor over the second empty text box, and click once to link the two text boxes. Now when you type or paste text into the first text box, and there’s too much to fit in the first box, it will overflow into the second box. The best part is that you can edit within either box, and the text will automatically flow back and forth as you cut or pad the story.

We now navigate to "Layout" and choose "Booklet" from the Layout drop-down list. It is important to verify that the option "Facing pages" is active in order to see the magazine as it is read: the first and last pages as individual pages (as if the magazine is closed), and then pages 2-3, 4-5, etc. However, when creating the PDF each page will be individual, as it should be, so you can use any imposition software. If an object or image occupies two pages, it will be cut automatically.


A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
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