Choose the figure number paragraph style in the list on the left, and the specific figure you’re pointing at in the list on the right. Then set the Format to Paragraph Number — after all, there’s no text in the paragraph; you just want its “number.” Don’t forget to set Appearance to Invisible so that you don’t have incredibly ugly black rectangles all over your document.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
It's not good if the file is opened in a different version of the program because some things can change. For example, the fills of CorelDRAW X7 are quite different to those of previous versions and also allow selective transparency. For this reason, if you save the file back as a previous version, the program will ask if you want to convert text to curves and fills to bitmaps.
Since the first version of Adobe InDesign was introduced, several improvements have been made for creating numbered lists. The Bullets and Numbering dialog box lets you modify a numbered list and updates automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet, numbering style, character style, separator, font attribute and indent spacing.

If you're using Word Online, you can add page breaks but not section breaks. If you have the Word desktop application, use the Open in Word command to open the document. When you’re done and you save the document, it will continue to be stored where you opened it in Word Online. If you don’t have Word, you can try or buy it in the latest version of Office now.


automatic page numbering Adobe Indesign CC 2014, how to insert page numbers. How to skip page number on cover page and back cover. How to start page number 1 after cover and contents page. How to start and end page numbering where you want.Macbook pro, iMac, macbook air, macbook, macbook retina display, macbook retina display 2, mac pro, iMac retina 5k display , mac mini,apple laptop ,custom page numbering. Page numbering tricks in Indesign CC, adobe indesign 2014. Page numbers. all about page numbers indesign. Page numbering advance Indesign. Windows, laptop, desktop.tutorial . how to page number indesign
I never place .eps files. I place the native .ai files instead and haven’t had a problem. I prefer points and picas, but that’s just my choice. I remember the olden days in college with fondness…when we actually learned about points and picas and drew letters with pencil on tracing paper to learn about line spacing, word spacing, and kerning. Our fonts were Helvetica, Bodoni, Garamond, and (oops, too vintage here…I forget). Type On!
Provides me every feature I need to create impressive ,quality drawings. It has particularly been useful when I need to create logos or any other vector based drawings. I leverage on Corels SHAPE TOOL to correct any errors and shortcomings in my drawings using nodes. I also like Corels text tool for their typographic quality , allowing me play around with texts..
As a magazine design, the process is similar but with a few differences. The first step, as always, is to define the format of the magazine. Suppose the finished magazine should measure 19x27 cm then double-click on the page border (this takes us to: Tools > Options > Workspace > Document > Page Size), and choose the size of two pages together: 38x27 cm (the bleed as always, should be 3mm but can be more if preferred).
If you are sending the original .CDR file, you must provide all the required information. The best way to do this is to go to File > Collect for Output…, which creates a new folder with a copy of the .CDR file, the fonts used and the color profile. If you are using externally linked images, these files will be also be included. Optionally, you can also create a PDF.
Microsoft's Word and Publisher tools are applications, which are sometimes used for similar tasks, including typing and editing text and placing, cropping, resizing and rotating images. Does this mean we have two MS Office tools serving the same purpose? No it doesn't, Word and Publisher were designed to provide solutions for specific types of documents and content. Therefore, you need to select which application is more relevant for your specific desktop publishing (DTP) requirements.
Let's say you want to use different page numbers or number formats and styles in different parts of your document. You could use page numbers such as i, ii, iii… for the introduction and table of contents and 1, 2, 3… for everything after. The trick is to divide the document into sections and to make sure those sections aren’t linked. Then, set the page numbering for each of those sections by following these steps.

Microsoft’s own Publisher program is a step down from those applications in both power and price, but not every version of Office includes Publisher, and it costs $140 to purchase separately. However, chances are good that you already own a copy of Microsoft Word, and that software has a host of desktop publishing tools that you can use to produce pages that rival the output of the best layout artist.

We will create an imaginary logo, and we apply the Blue Style. Then, to create the background, double click on the Rectangle tool (Toolbox > Rectangle tool or F6), to create a rectangle the size of the page. We apply the Yellow Style, and we then create a gradient (we press the G-key to activate the Interactive Fill tool and drag the handles to adjust the gradient). Finally, we expand the size to cover the bleed area. As the card measures 90x50 mm, we will make the background of 96x56 mm, centered on the page (to center the background object, select and press P on the keyboard).
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.
I have read up on the InDesign figures and cross referencing and have been testing this out. I am using separate text boxes for each figure description with the jump frames command. When I delete a figure the numbers automatically update and I can update the cross references. However, when I add a figure the numbers go out of sequence and I can’t work out how to update them. Perhaps there is another setting I need to change? Is there a way of numbering text boxes sequentially? I was able to thread boxes to update the numbers but this could lead to problems down the line…Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated.

Pros: I love corel draw, working with it has been an amazing experience, it has truly set us apart in the fact that our presentations, documents and poster's quality has improved greatly, we always get compliments from our clients. There is a major difference when presenting for example a pie chart taken directly from excel that one vectorized with corel and our clients love it.
In 1987, Corel engineers Michel Bouillon and Pat Beirne undertook to develop a vector-based illustration program to bundle with their desktop publishing systems. That program, CorelDraw, was initially released in 1989. CorelDraw 1.x and 2.x ran under Windows 2.x and 3.0. CorelDraw 3.0 came into its own with Microsoft's release of Windows 3.1. The inclusion of TrueType in Windows 3.1 transformed CorelDraw into a serious illustration program capable of using system-installed outline fonts without requiring third-party software such as Adobe Type Manager; paired with a photo-editing program (Corel Photo-Paint), a font manager and several other pieces of software, it was also part of the first all-in-one graphics suite.
One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
Cut and copy work in a similar way. Highlighting a piece of text, right-clicking and selecting copy/cut will store the text in memory [memory: used to store data ]. The difference is copy leaves the highlighted text behind where as cut removes it. To insert the copied/cut text into a different area of the document, a different document, or an entirely different application altogether, right-click and select paste.
Cons: The biggest problem CorelDraw faces is that it is not advancing as quickly as its competitors. I still believe it is the best tool for the specific projects I had in the past, but if I had a project that involved solely vector illustration, or photo editing, I'm not sure if CorelDraw would be the best choice for it. It really shines in projects that would normally require a mix of PS, AI and ID. I hope that it continues to advance in the future so that it remains relevant for other types of projects as well.
Pros: I use this software from so many years ago and with the time they have always improve, I use this to modify and edit images vectorizing and making great design for my presentations, through the years Corel DRAW have added more features and options to make the design more complex and details, the bright options and the vectorizing tool are better than they were in the past, the details of the images is awesome and the extension are endless, for design this is one of my favorites.
On the "Prepress" tab you have the option of activating "Bleed Limit". Even if the current document does not have an active bleed, you can activate it while creating the PDF. But remember that the objects must extend out from the page limit. Activating the "Bleed Limit" does not automatically increase the size of objects used to create the design. Another option which is often useful is to activate "Crop marks" to indicate the limits of our design. For this reason it is important that the page size is the real size.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
CK Note: Word 2007 - 2013 interface has an different automatic numbering scheme which I have been told is much less subject to corruption. Microsoft Word 2010 Bible by Herb Tyson, MVP. However numbering is still very imperfect in these later versions. I still recommend following Shauna Kelly's step-by-step instructions (see above) if setting up numbering in a template or in a document likely to be heavily edited. If you start without doing this and end up with "spaghetti numbering," fixing it will be a very large chore!
Sorry to hear it, but many thanks for the confirmation.  It will save me time looking for easier solutions.  I'll manually solve the problem this time, waiting until right before printing before I # the notes across docs manually, and think of a script if I continue to use InDesign after.  Still, I'm stunned that the coders have built in automatic page numbering, and yet not this.  Not much different for footnotes, as you suggest (check the final # of footnotes, increment by 1 and that is the # of the first footnote in the next doc), and as someone else mentioned. 

- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
Dark interface propbems – (sorry last post went wrong!!) Is there anyway of changing the interface colour in CS6? I would also prefer a lighter interface as can’t always see the type on the darker grey, can’t seem to find it on 6. Also does anyone know if you can make the handles on drawing objects any larger? All the designers must hace very young eyes, as a more mature designer(!!) they are REALLY difficult to see even with glasses and they stay the same size when you zoom in.
We will create an imaginary logo, and we apply the Blue Style. Then, to create the background, double click on the Rectangle tool (Toolbox > Rectangle tool or F6), to create a rectangle the size of the page. We apply the Yellow Style, and we then create a gradient (we press the G-key to activate the Interactive Fill tool and drag the handles to adjust the gradient). Finally, we expand the size to cover the bleed area. As the card measures 90x50 mm, we will make the background of 96x56 mm, centered on the page (to center the background object, select and press P on the keyboard).
InDesign CC 2019 can now attempt to intelligently and automatically fit the best part of an image inside a frame, rather than your having to manually position it. Of course, what “the best part of the image” means is always open to argument, but Adobe is using a machine-learning algorithm—part of their Adobe Sensei artificial intelligence initiative.
   If you are a shop that relies on one version of CorelDRAW and it is installed on multiple computers, you may be in for a surprise and added expense if you update to a service pack 6.1 or higher, or if you decide that when a new version of CorelDRAW comes out, you want to upgrade and install one license on a number of computers. For example, if you usually have four people working at the same time on their own computers, then each version on each computer will require its own license. I know that a lot of shops have the same version of CorelDRAW on multiple computers. So, when upgrade time comes you could be in for a significantly higher cost.
Excellent stylus support (including the ability to adjust stylus tilt, bearing and rotation in real time). A quick editing workflow. Each node has a distinct appearance depending on the handle or selection type, and the size, colours and shapes of the editing points are customisable via Options. More intuitive interactive sliders for gradients, blends, transparency and so on wrap up a decent release. desktop numbering using indesign
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