If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:


My problem is similar but it happens when the same printer is used and different pcs. We have several word docs that are the direction inserts for the products we make. They were all created with Word XP and all are formatted to fit to 2 pages. We got 2 new Dell Optiplex pcs last year. No problem. We got 2 new Dell Vostro pcs in April. No problem. We upgraded to Word 2003 in June. There is no problem with the new pcs but on the old pcs, the direction inserts spread to more than 2 pages, a lot more. The pcs are networked and they are all accessing the same files. They all run Windows XP home edition. When you print the insert from the old pc it is evident that the font looks a little bigger. Of course we could change the formatting but then, when printed from the new pcs the text would be too small. It
Eliminate the need to draw and project dimension objects in multiple steps thanks to the advanced dimension tools. Display precise measurement values in building plans and more, including radial and diameter dimensioning. Plus, with projected dimension options, your projected drawings can be quickly documented with precise and dynamic dimension lines and text.
The easiest way to implement a numbering scheme for headings is to add one to a heading style. To illustrate, we'll modify Heading 1 by adding a numbering scheme. First, right-click Heading 1 in the Styles gallery (in the Styles group on the Home tab). Then, choose Modify as shown in Figure A to launch the Modify Style dialog. If you thumb through the default properties, you'll not find a numbering scheme (Figure B). Click the Format button and choose Numbering as shown in Figure B. If necessary, click the Numbering tab. Choose the predefined scheme that's the best match for what you want (Figure C).
24 Aug 1995[12] 6 3, 4, 5, 6 5, 6 95 This is the first version which was made exclusively for 32-bit Windows. New features were customizable interface, Polygon, Spiral, Knife and Eraser tools. Corel Memo, Corel Presents, Corel Motion 3D, Corel Depth, Corel Multimedia Manager, Corel Font Master and Corel DREAM (for 3D modelling) were included in the suite.

Cons: A big handicap that corel has is the fact that it is not easy to learn or streamlined at all, for you to even create basic designs you need not only to learn every command it has but also to learn how they all work, and in some cases just using one basic command requires more than 5 steps, It is an excellent software but you will need to invest a lot of time to master ir.


Better performance when working with text. Improvements have been made in text performance—for example, in typing, deleting, adding columns, and inserting footnotes—providing a snappier performance. However, note that at the time of this writing, there is a frustrating performance problem that appears the first time you select the Type tool after launching InDesign. Fortunately, this long delay doesn’t appear again until the next time you launch InDesign.
Microsoft Publisher’s templates make publication design easy. If you need to create a quick publication with minimal effort, you can simply use one of Microsoft Publisher’s many templates. There are hundreds of easy-to-use templates to choose from, which are designed to simplify the layout and make creating your ideal publication quick and easy. If you can’t find the template you’re looking for, simply go online and you’re bound to find one you can download for free!
Hi David, i just figured this out, using CS6, if you place all your graphics and set up a figure number style, and place some of your styles in an inline text frame and the ones that need to fall outside the text frame, the numbering will be off, UNTIL you take the blue anchor frame and anchor it to text of the stand alone graphics, then the figure numbers will then be in order. It also works on 11×17 pages where you have to link the figure number to the previous page and then Anchor Object options and use the Inline or above Line (position) to move text frame to the next page. :-)

I never place .eps files. I place the native .ai files instead and haven’t had a problem. I prefer points and picas, but that’s just my choice. I remember the olden days in college with fondness…when we actually learned about points and picas and drew letters with pencil on tracing paper to learn about line spacing, word spacing, and kerning. Our fonts were Helvetica, Bodoni, Garamond, and (oops, too vintage here…I forget). Type On!
A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
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To create an index entry which refers to another entry, select one of the cross-reference options (such as See or See also) from the Type pop‑up menu, and input the entry name in the Referenced text box, or drag the existing entry from the list at the bottom to the Referenced box. You can also customize the See and See also terms displayed in the cross-reference entries by selecting Custom Cross Reference from the Type pop‑up menu. (See Add “See” or “See also” cross-references to an index.)
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