23 Feb 2010[23] X5 (15) 7 to X5 7 to X5 XP, Vista, 7, 8 Built-in content organizer (CorelConnect), CD, web graphics and animation tools, multi-core performance improvement, digital content (professional fonts, clip arts, and photos), object hinting, pixel view, enhanced Mesh tool with transparency options, added touch support, and new supported file formats.[24] It has developed Transformation, which makes multiple copies of a single object.

If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
For my workflow, I decided to turn off Check Links Before Opening Document in the File Handling pane of the Preference dialog. Yes, sometimes I do have the imported files, but in those cases I don’t move the files. And I have to check the links before output anyway. Anything you can do to make opening documents more seamless is nice, so check out this preference and others in this area.

PSDs take up significant memory, which can sometime cause problems when exporting as PDF. I would recommend avoiding PSD files for simple images that could just as easily be flattened when saved as TIFF or EPS. But in cases where using a PSD file really solves a problem, make sure it is 300 PPI and in CMYK color mode, and keep it at its actual size. And when exporting to PDF, double-check that the transparency flattening is set to high.
Let's say you want to use different page numbers or number formats and styles in different parts of your document. You could use page numbers such as i, ii, iii… for the introduction and table of contents and 1, 2, 3… for everything after. The trick is to divide the document into sections and to make sure those sections aren’t linked. Then, set the page numbering for each of those sections by following these steps.

Choosing a CMYK color profile doesn't means that all objects will be CMYK automatically. When you import an image, or copy/paste a text, if the image is RGB it will be stored as RGB until you change the color mode. The best way is to use a image-editing software (such as Corel PHOTO-PAINT, included with the CorelDRAW Graphics Suite, or Corel PaintShop Pro), for correcting the image before importing it in to CorelDRAW. But if you insert an RGB image you can always change the color mode later. (NOTE: You can go to File > Document Properties… to make sure that all objects are in CMYK mode) For this reason it's so important to have a good color management.
Add all of the elements that are repeated throughout most of your document: guides, page numbers, a running text box, image frames, graphic elements, etc. You can have more than one set of master pages in a document, which is particularly useful for brochures, whose content often varies (for example, with a mostly textual introduction followed by image-heavy pages).
At this point, you could click OK and start your document. But, let's modify the scheme instead. Click the Define New Number Format button. In the resulting dialog, click the Font button and choose Chiller from the Font list and click OK (only once). Click inside the Number format control—to the left of the example character—and enter Heading, as shown in Figure D. Click OK twice. If you check the properties now (Figure B), you'll find a numbering scheme. Click OK once more to return to the document. Heading 1 in the Styles Quick Gallery displays the new numbering scheme.
None of the provided options in the Bullets & Numbering / Numbers drop down list seem to do it. In the “Insert Number Placeholder” there is only a “Chapter Number” option in there. Is there a trick to make the “section prefix” show up somehow – it’s too logical for it not to be there – it must be hiding somewhere! Maybe you did that you reveal and I missed it!
Pros: CorelDRAW is mostly used software in world of graphics designing in computer and printing press industry. It is the largest world using software that support approximately all languages including unicode languages. It has a lot of tool sets built in the software to design beautiful graphics. It is also using in the newspapers, magazines and books publishing markets. In Pakistan everyone who want become a designer it should have great skills on CorelDRAW. Now these days there are many free and open source softwares available for designing but CorelDRAW is beating all of them.
A new feature with the ungainly name “Space Between Paragraphs Having the Same Style” is a useful addition to setting spacing in the Paragraph, Control, and Paragraph Styles panels. It is particularly useful when setting bulleted lists, numbered lists, and block quotes. It allows you to use one style for lists, instead of resorting to separate styles to create the proper space above and below the list.
The "Color mode" refers to the way in which we use the file, in this case, for high quality printing. The first choice is between RGB or CMYK color modes. RGB has brighter shades but is only good for web and desktop printers (for example inkjet printers) and plotters, but not for commercial printing. RGB has 16.8 million colors and CMYK only 64,000 but all commercial printers use CMYK. If you use a RGB color profile, the color mode will change when the file is sent to print, and perhaps the result will be bad or inaccurate. Then, you should choose CMYK as the "primary color mode" in both dialogues of Tools > Color Management.

In general, change the feature settings in the dialog box, and then save the settings. Styles and presets are stored in the document in which they are created. You can use the settings from another document by importing or loading the styles and presets from that document. In addition, most presets can be exported or saved to a separate file and distributed to other computers.
If you do not want pdf, you can install the MS Office document image writer. Create document in word, excel etc, select print from file menu and change the default printer to the document image writer. It will give you an image of your document which will not change in different systems and can be viewed same as the original document by every one whom you forward it.
Theory is great, and articles like this one can give you quick useful tips, but the best way to learn is by practice. If you are new to InDesign, try this: use an existing layout as a guide (anything you want: a page from a magazine, a poster or a business card), and try to recreate it from scratch. Familiarize yourself with the tools, menus and options. If you get stuck, you can always search for tips and tutorials or ask a friend.
For multiple figure references, I am using Grant’s solution, i.e.: captions are numbered “Figure^.^#:” and then my basic paragraph style GREPs any “Figure~.” to an invisible style (tiny font, white colour). I chose a punctuation space (^. or ~. in GREP) to distinguish it from other instances of “Figure “. This is pretty effective, but another issue remains unresolved: it seems one cannot include a nonbreaking space in a number/bullet style. This means that the text “Figure 121” can break across lines (I have tried selecting “No Break” in my caption style…no joy). So even now that the resulting string is “Figure^SFigure^.121”, where “Figure^.” is invisible, the break at the punctuation space (^.) occurs.
I’m new to InDesign, and thought I had sorted out figure numbering but am having trouble with the way that figures are numbered in my document. I set it up as described in this post, but some of my figures are in line and the captions are just another line of text in the body of the story, while others are full page graphics with text box captions that are not linked to the body of the document. Currently, the figure numbers run sequentially through the figures that are in line in the document, and then continue with the full page graphics. The problem is that the full page graphics come before any of the in line graphics, so they are out of order. Is there any way to correct this?
To make the best use of the first few pages of a newsletter, you should start a long story on one page and finish it on a later page. That way, you can fit more stories on the front page, which is what your readers will see first. You can accomplish this by placing the story in linked text boxes, so that when the first text box is full, excess text will automatically flow into the second text box.
If the same characters are input in the Topic Level box, they are handled as separate index entries if a different yomi is entered. For example if “Cat” is input as an index entry with a reading of “Neko” in katakana, and then input a second time with a reading of “Neko” in hiragana, two index items for “Cat” will be generated. This feature can also be used to classify the same term under separate index topics. For example, when entering the term “The Cats” in an index, if “Cats” is input in the Yomi text box and two index entries are created without any input, the term “The Cats” will be generated under the T and C index topics.
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