InDesign can import many image formats (including JPEG, PNG, EPS, PICT, PDF, PSD and TIFF). If you are preparing a file for print, make sure the images are in an acceptable format. If you’re using a file format that allows for low-resolution settings, such as JPEG, check that the images have a resolution of 300 pixels per inch (PPI) and are saved in CMYK color mode.

Sorry to hear it, but many thanks for the confirmation.  It will save me time looking for easier solutions.  I'll manually solve the problem this time, waiting until right before printing before I # the notes across docs manually, and think of a script if I continue to use InDesign after.  Still, I'm stunned that the coders have built in automatic page numbering, and yet not this.  Not much different for footnotes, as you suggest (check the final # of footnotes, increment by 1 and that is the # of the first footnote in the next doc), and as someone else mentioned. 
Content-Aware Fit is not enabled by default. If you want to make it apply automatically to all placed images, turn on “Make Content-Aware Fit the default frame fitting option” in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box. You may find some type of graphics work well with the algorithm and some may not, so you may need to experiment with the images used in your workflow. In my experience, the feature seems to work better with raster images than with vector graphics.
The ability to create custom paragraph and character styles is an excellent time-saving feature. This pane is visible in the work area by default, and if you’ve hidden it for some reason, you can bring it up by pressing Command/Control + F11. You can create styles exactly to your liking using many options; and then you can apply them to a portion of text with just one click.
However, there are a few caveats you need to know. First, you can only import comments on a PDF that was exported from InDesign CC 2019 or later. Second, don’t edit the InDesign document before importing comments; otherwise they may not be correctly positioned. And finally, PDFs created using the Book feature won’t work correctly in the PDF Comments panel.
Excellent stylus support (including the ability to adjust stylus tilt, bearing and rotation in real time). A quick editing workflow. Each node has a distinct appearance depending on the handle or selection type, and the size, colours and shapes of the editing points are customisable via Options. More intuitive interactive sliders for gradients, blends, transparency and so on wrap up a decent release. desktop numbering using indesign
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