Virtual Memory is used by Windows to swap information from RAM to the hard disk in order to free memory for use by applications when physical RAM is low. A paging file is used to accomplish this task. By default, Windows manages the paging file size and sets it to 1.5 times the amount of RAM on the system. This can be increased in cases where CorelDRAW appears to slow as a result of graphic and object intensive documents. When setting the paging size, the max size should never exceed 3 times that amount of physical RAM installed on the computer. To increase Virtual Memory settings, please consult the Windows help files.
      As mentioned, you must have an account to get any updates now with version X6, which is different from earlier versions of CorelDRAW. In older versions, updating CorelDRAW with a service pack involved going to the Corel website and downloading the service pack. In more recent versions, the update could be done automatically via the Update command in the Help menu in the software. With Version 6.1, updates can only be done after you create an account with Corel and then log into the account via CorelDRAW.
For Pinyin, if multiple words have the same Pinyin, the order is sorted by (1) tone and (2) stroke count in ascending order. For Stroke Count, each character is sorted by (1) stroke count, (2) first stroke, and (3) second stroke. You can either edit the sort information directly in the Sort By field, or you can click the arrow to the right of the Sort By field to open either the Pinyin Entry dialog box or Stroke Count Entry dialog box. You can edit the fields and click OK. Repeat this process for each topic level.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
Click on the section of the document to which you want content added. Your document will feature multiple frames, into which text or pictures can be added. In most cases, Publisher places example text and photos in each template to provide you with a general idea of how to write and format your document. For example, if creating an envelope, Publisher inserts dummy addresses in the appropriate text frames on the document so you can replace the text with your own information.
Second (and more interesting) is that you can apply text formatting to text frames you’ve selected using the Selection tool or the Direct Selection tool. When you do this, InDesign applies the formatting to all of the text in the text frame, including any overset text. InDesign won’t let you use this method to apply formatting to text frames that are linked to other text frames. Tired of using the Type tool to select and format every photo caption on a page? Use the Selection tool to select them all and apply your formatting—it’s easier, and it’s quicker (see Figure 4-1).
If you’re like most designers, you spend a significant amount of time picking just the right font, including previewing the way it appears in different parts of your layout. So you’re going to be very happy about a new method of previewing and selecting fonts. Plus, InDesign CC 2019 introduces a new font type that supports glyphs with colors and gradients.
Publications by Wizard provides you with templates you can modify to suit your needs. You have several formatting choices including: Newsletter, Web Sites, Announcement, Invitations, and more. These format choices are located in the left frame of the Catalog window under the title Wizard.� Within each of these formats, you will find many styles, or designs, from which to choose.

Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
- [Voiceover] When laying out artwork, it's easy to make sure that objects are properly aligned with other objects. In CorelDRAW, it can be done in a number of different ways. From the View menu, you'll see that I have the ability to select Grids, Rulers, Guidelines, as well as alignment guides. These are some of the tools that make it easy to align objects within the document. There's also the ability to do snapping. And of course I can snap to the document grid, baseline grid, guidelines, as well as objects and the page itself. Under the Tools menu, Options, then Document, here we have the ability to set up the frequency of guidelines, grids, rulers, and that sort of thing. I'm going to talk a little bit more about this in a few minutes. For now, let me just cancel this, and we're gonna take a look at the rulers. You'll notice that we have two rulers. One is a horizontal ruler across the top and we have a vertical ruler down the left-hand side. You may notice that our zero zero coordinate is bottom left-hand corner. If for some reason we wish to change that, it's easy enough simply by left-clicking where the rulers intersect, and I'm gonna drag and drop this to the top, left-hand corner of my page. That's effectively reset the zero zero coordinates to the top left corner. Now if I want to draw with better accuracy, I can actually left-click where the rulers intersect, hold the Shift key down, and drag the rulers right out onto the page. Makes it a lot easier to get down and get into the fine details when you're drawing on the document. I'm gonna hold the Shift key down, left-click and drag the rulers back to where they belong. Now the next way to assist in lining objects up is by using the grid. Underneath my View menu, I'll go down to Grid and I'm gonna select Document Grid. Here you can see our document grid is set up as a dot pattern. This is easy enough to change. From the Tools menu, go down to Options, highlight Grid, and here we can show the grid either as dots or as lines. I also have the ability to change the frequency of the grid. I'm going to change this to .5 And you'll see I have Snap-To is turned on. I'll click OK to this, and now set up the grid at .5 and now you can see if I draw a rectangle, I'm going to left-click and drag and I can move this rectangle around and you can see it's going to snap to the gridlines for me. Now the next way to assist in lining things up is to use Guidelines. But first, before I do that, let me go to the View menu down to Grid, and I'm going to turn off the document grid. Guidelines are created by dragging in from the rulers. So I can drag in from my horizontal ruler, left-click, and I'm going to drag down and I'll position a guideline here. I'll left-click my vertical ruler and I can position another guideline here. So it's very easy to bring guidelines out on the page, and I'll just say it's simply a matter of clicking on the ruler and dragging down onto the screen itself. You'll notice that these guidelines are blue while this one is red. The reason that is, is because this is a guideline that's currently selected. Let me just select my Pick tool and when I click on this guideline, you can see it's turned red. It's very easy to change the color of guidelines and one reason why you might want to do that is if you had multiple layers and you want guidelines on these multiple layers you can have separate colors for different layers. I'm gonna left-click on this green and I'm gonna drag and drop that on top of this guideline and that's gonna change that guideline green. Again, one that's currently selected and if I select this one, it will turn red. But if I deselect it or select a different guideline, then of course it goes back to the green. Now another way to add guidelines is to use the guideline docker. And there is a couple of different ways to get there. I can click on this little icon here to go to my guidelines. I can go to Windows, down to Dockers and select Guidelines, or quicker and easier, simply double-click on a guideline and that's going to open up the docker for me. In here I have the ability to very precisely position guidelines where I want them. Now the final way to align objects on the page is to use Alignment Guides. Let me go to the Windows menu, down to Dockers, then I'm going to select Alignment and Dynamic Guidelines. In here I want to turn on my alignment guides so it's simply a matter of clicking on this little icon. Now I've gone ahead and I've changed the color of this so that my alignment guides are now a darker brown. It's a lot easier for me to see. If for some reason you want to change the color, it's simply a matter of hitting the drop-down and I can select whatever color I want in here. By default, it's a light blue. So let's leave that as it is, and now when I create a rectangle, you'll notice that as I move around my page I have these alignment guides which allow me to very precisely position the next object that I'm creating. Again, left-click and drag, and again, very easy to align objects on the page. So with a little bit of set up, you can see how easy it is to have increased accuracy while creating your design.
      Now I know this is a big change for Corel. Traditionally, they have been opposed to policing how many times you installed the program on x number of computers. They seemed to be more concerned with the number of users than how many paid licenses they had. I can remember that for years you could buy the upgrade version and install it as a full version without ever needing to show a previous version as your proof of ownership. In all my years of buying software, I had never seen this before CorelDRAW. Well I guess Corel, like everyone else, is trying to clamp down and control who is using the program. Because of this, I am sure there are a number of users out there who will now probably take a closer look at whether or not they will upgrade.

Number-Pro makes numbering raffle tickets and forms easy using your desktop publishing software like Indesign, Microsoft Word and Publisher and Corel Draw. Number Pro creates a data merge file based on your numbering requirements that can easily be integrated into the desktop publishing software that allows for printing directly to your small business or home printer.

For multiple figure references, I am using Grant’s solution, i.e.: captions are numbered “Figure^.^#:” and then my basic paragraph style GREPs any “Figure~.” to an invisible style (tiny font, white colour). I chose a punctuation space (^. or ~. in GREP) to distinguish it from other instances of “Figure “. This is pretty effective, but another issue remains unresolved: it seems one cannot include a nonbreaking space in a number/bullet style. This means that the text “Figure 121” can break across lines (I have tried selecting “No Break” in my caption style…no joy). So even now that the resulting string is “Figure^SFigure^.121”, where “Figure^.” is invisible, the break at the punctuation space (^.) occurs.


Lastly, please do not use the keyboard shortcuts in this article to achieve foot and inch marks. The true marks are in the Symbol font – or can be found in the “glyphs” palette. The other marks are prime and double prime; seasoned designers and typographers know the difference, just as they know the differences and uses between hyphens, en-dashes and em-dashes.
I am editing a lengthy document (140 pages) in Spanish. At the beginning of the document I could right click on a word and get a list of synonyms and had the option in most cases of looking at a thesaurus as well. But as I progressed in the document, the synonym / thesaurus function stopped appearing as a option. I’m using MSOffice 2013. How can I get it back?

Cons: The basic disadvantage that I find is the same as it applies to any graphic software of vector character: you must have a computer equipped with a powerful and powerful processor that allows you to perform all the calculations necessary to design with this software, a task that becomes a lot slower to the extent that the number of data rises, as more elaborate designs are desired.


If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
I love Adobe InDesign. For multi-page documents, it’s the most flexible and complete application out there. Yet I remember how counter-intuitive some things were when I was learning it for the first time. Here are some tips I wish I had known when starting out, as well as some answers to questions that others often ask me. This is not intended to be a manual; some good ones are already out there (although I personally learned by doing). Hopefully, these tips will help you make the best of your day-to-day use of InDesign. If you are preparing a document for print, keep your margins and bleeds in mind from the beginning. Your printer will give you the measurements for the bleed, but generally 1⁄8 inch or 3 mm should suffice. Approximately the same area within the document should be kept free of text and important graphic elements (such as the logo). Set up your document for bleed in InDesign as you create it by selecting the correct settings in the document set-up box.

Other features that may be expected include find and replace, which replaces one word with another, and the ability to import [import: A good or service which enters a country. ] graphics [graphics: visuals intended to brand, inform, illustrate or entertain, eg photographs, drawings, maps, diagrams etc. ], eg from a clip art [clip art: clip art is a library of images, photos and sounds provided by Microsoft as part of its office suite ] library. Headers and footers and page numbering are also very useful.
However, there are a few caveats you need to know. First, you can only import comments on a PDF that was exported from InDesign CC 2019 or later. Second, don’t edit the InDesign document before importing comments; otherwise they may not be correctly positioned. And finally, PDFs created using the Book feature won’t work correctly in the PDF Comments panel.
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!

Finally, here’s a small but welcome improvement: in earlier versions of InDesign, when you exported a PDF, the default file name would be the last one you used for a PDF export—even though the document name may have changed. This would often cause errors or confusion when the PDF name didn’t match the document name it was made from. Now, when you export a PDF, a new checkbox option appears in the Export dialog box: Use InDesign Document Name as the Output Filename. (Note that the new feature also appears and works in other export formats as well.)
The CorelWORLD Real Life Video Tutorials was produced for the CorelWORLD Conference. The video package features more than 2.5 hours of tutorials on CorelDRAW, including extensive lessons on Corel® PHOTO-PAINT™. Discover how easy a difficult task can be when you apply the correct process, and see why things go wrong when you don't make the right choices. The tutorial package is included for free with the WorkPLACE Ready Training Package.
In its first versions, the CDR file format was a completely proprietary file format primarily used for vector graphic drawings, recognizable by the first two bytes of the file being "WL". Starting with CorelDraw 3, the file format changed to a Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) envelope, recognizable by the first four bytes of the file being "RIFF", and a "CDR*vrsn" in bytes 9 to 15, with the asterisk "*" being in early versions just a blank.[33] Beginning with CorelDraw 4 it included the version number of the writing program in hexadecimal ("4" meaning version 4, "D" meaning version 14). The actual data chunk of the RIFF remains a Corel proprietary format.
Work quickly and efficiently with the added control for the Windows Real-Time Stylus pen-compatible tablets, such as the Microsoft Surface, in addition to the Wacom tablet and devices. Use pressure to vary the size of the eraser nib, and also link the tilt and bearing to its flatness and rotation. Flipping the stylus or pen activates the Eraser tool to erase on the fly without using the toolbox.
Hello, I am having way too much trouble with Indesign to the point I just hate this program. I changed the visualization of the document in preferences like you said to high quality but the document which is from Illustrator still looks like crap when before it looked good. Also, the option in object that also says to change the visual quality is greyed out and I have no clue why aor how to change it. Getting desperate here, please help!
Yes, it is also possible to manually change a color (Edit > Find and Replace > Replace Objects > Replace a Color...), but it is necessary to change every color and every shade of this color for each page. The Color Styles docker will replace the color and all shades on all pages in just one step. But it is important to remember that it is necessary to "apply" the Color Style to the object, since it is not enough to be "Yellow" or the same color (e.g. Pantone 012), the Color Style must be applied. When you change the Color Style, only the objects using that style will change, not all yellow objects.
You Forgot to mention the awesome new Spinning Beach Ball Feature in Indesign 2019…. yea hundreds of upgraders report Spinning Beach Balls at every turn.. even in iMac Pros w/ 40GB of RAM.. Yea just like last year, riddled with Bugs. I’ll stick with 13.1.0 until March or April 2019 when Adobe addresses all this and more in the one and only update for the year. Quark is waiting stage left.
You may want to set out an essay with two different number styles. In academic essays Roman numerals start after the title page until the body of the essay begins. For example this may include an abstract, table of contents, executive summary etc… Arabic numbers start from the main body of the essay. To achieve this you will need to use section breaks in your document. Change the number format in the Page Number Format window.
You may know that Adobe uses voting on the InDesign Uservoice site to help determine which new features to add, and one of the top vote-getters has long been “Please make it possible to insert footnotes in tables.” Well, hallelujah: You can now include footnotes within tables. Plus, you can convert footnotes to endnotes and endnotes to footnotes in your document. And, also in the category of long document feature improvements, Adobe made a few small tweaks to the Index panel.
You can now preview type you have selected in a layout in any font by hovering your mouse over the font name in a list of fonts. This can be used in the Control panel, Character panel, and Properties panel menus. For example, in Figure 5, the heading for a book cover is selected on the page, and in the font family menu, Abadi MT Condensed Extra Bold is being previewed. (In earlier versions, you could do something similar, but you had to hover and also press a modifier key on the keyboard.) You can also preview the currently selected text directly in the font family menu by setting the sample text options pop-up menu to Selected Text.

When you click More Options in the Generate Index dialog box, formatting options appear that let you determine the style and appearance of the generated index. InDesign includes a number of built‑in paragraph and character styles that you can select to format the generated index, or you can create and select your own styles. After you generate the index, you can edit these styles in the Paragraph Styles and Character Styles panels.
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