In Word 2003, in Format | Bullets and Numbering, choose the Outline Numbered tab. The second pane in the bottom row of the gallery should show 1 Heading 1, 1.1 Heading 2, 1.1.1 Heading 3. If it does not, select it and click Reset (and answer Yes). With the insertion point in a Heading 1 paragraph, apply that format. The numbering will already be just what you want and will be linked to the heading styles. If you want to fine-tune the indents, you can click on Customize.
After struggling with multi-level lists I finally figured out one of the major problems. If you are struggling but you haven't already read other tutorials, you definitely should, but this tip will be useful no matter what. Before setting or re-setting the list for a given heading, select "None". Then go back and select the list you want. For some reason if you try to switch directly from one list to another it does horrid things that I do not understand. Hope that helps.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
Generating numbered tickets in Microsoft Word document might seem quite challenging and a taxing task if you are a novel user who is not adept in handling Word documents.You might have made numerous attempts in exploring Word templates and might have been fruitless, depressed and annoyed with all the alternatives and problems that you might have come across while trying to comprehend how to create tickets in Word.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)

I came across this website that explained how to do it using Microsoft's "Raffle Ticket" template (https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-create-numbered-tickets-in-word). However, when I tried to update the sequences as the article said, I could not find the option to update the field (I think they were referring to the option "edit field"), after copying and pasting the template onto a second page.
Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday!
	Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.

In Word 2003, in Format | Bullets and Numbering, choose the Outline Numbered tab. The second pane in the bottom row of the gallery should show 1 Heading 1, 1.1 Heading 2, 1.1.1 Heading 3. If it does not, select it and click Reset (and answer Yes). With the insertion point in a Heading 1 paragraph, apply that format. The numbering will already be just what you want and will be linked to the heading styles. If you want to fine-tune the indents, you can click on Customize.
Summary: Need to add a unique serial number to each printed copy of your document? Here's a quick way to print such numbered versions. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Using Sequential Document Serial Numbers.)
Thank you for these instructions!! I'm using them to auto number my son's baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I'm using Word on a PC. Thanks!!

The event will set up certain prizes. Raffle tickets are then sold, and the people told to hold them until the raffle is held. Raffle tickets are then drawn randomly, and the holders of the winning tickets get a prize. While organizers can be as creative as they wish, offering bulk purchases of tickets and discounts, the basic rules stay the same. The benefit of holding raffles is that donors enjoy the anticipation of possibly winning a prize, while donating to a charity. This makes raffle tickets one of the most popular ways to earn for a nonprofit.
I had wanted to create a file that didn't require Excel as the data source, so I created one using SEQ fields. It was terrible and too huge to mention (thanks Doug Robbins), so I recreated it using Word as the data source so that people who only have Word can use it. You can create up to 5,000 tickets without changing the data file. If you only have Word and need to create more than 5,000 tickets, please don't type the ticket numbers. Just drop me an email and I'll create another data file for you with the required numbers.
I'm using Word 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system, but this article applies to earlier versions. 365's browser edition displays numbered lists and offers a few basic settings. However, you can't apply either option discussed in this article using the browser. For your convenience, you can download the sample demonstration .docx or .doc file.
I've seen this (black rectangles instead of numbers) in one document that I received from someone else. I cured it by going through the sequence in the article that Charles cited, starting from the "Define New Multilevel List" choice in the menu of the Multilevel List button. (If there's already a list in effect, its settings will appear in the dialog, and you just have to repeat the setting for the affected level(s).)
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!

Thank you for these instructions!! I'm using them to auto number my son's baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I'm using Word on a PC. Thanks!!
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Using previously un-used heading levels would be more suitable for situations where you want to maintain two separate numbered lists that both make use of the "magic" properties of the built-in headings; for example, this would be the case when you set up appendix numbering as discussed in the article at https://shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/numberingappendixes.html.
You have two choices when faced with the task of numbering headings in a Word document. You can enter the numbers manually and hope nothing changes — lots of luck with that one. Or you can opt for the more efficient solution and create and apply a numbered style. Unfortunately, that can get you into even more trouble, if you don't know what you're doing. To avoid surprises, follow these 10 steps to add a numbering scheme to a style.
The SEQ or Sequential Numbering Function in Word is the best and quickest way to number your tickets. Many raffle ticket templates use them, yet few sites explain how it works. To see if it uses the SEQ function, you need to download the template first. Then, open it in Word, click right in the middle of where a serial number is, and then right-click.
Using previously un-used heading levels would be more suitable for situations where you want to maintain two separate numbered lists that both make use of the "magic" properties of the built-in headings; for example, this would be the case when you set up appendix numbering as discussed in the article at https://shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/numberingappendixes.html.
You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
Simply copy the second page of the template by highlighting that page and pressing CTRL + C. Windows shortcut keys Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Windows Keyboard Shortcuts 101: The Ultimate Guide Keyboard shortcuts can save you hours of time. Master the universal Windows keyboard shortcuts, keyboard tricks for specific programs, and a few other tips to speed up your work. Read More are wonderful things. Then create a new blank page by pressing CTRL + Enter. Then paste the copied page using CTRL + V. Create a new blank page, and paste again. Keep doing this until you have the desired number of pages that you will need.
It’s best to use something other than general copy paper when printing raffle tickets. Heavier weight paper, or even card stock, could be a better choice. Not only does it look more professional, but the tickets will tear off more easily along the perforation. Choose paper colors on the lighter end of the spectrum so that the template design shows up clearly when printed.
We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.

That’s enough tips for now. You’ll be filling your fundraising thermometer template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template How to Create Your Custom Excel Fundraising Thermometer Template Use an Excel thermometer chart to visually keep track of your financial goals. Whether you're saving for a new gadget or fundraising for a good cause, here's a step by step tutorial. Read More in no time. Let’s get to the tickets.

The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).
A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( "1" or "a" or "i"), whether the number is preceded by text (eg "Chapter 1" or "Part A"), whether the number includes previous levels' numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).
In a nutshell, the solution is to set up a new Multilevel list style yourself - the procedure from the URL above is a wonderfully detailed step-by-step on how to do it and this will most certainly address the problem.  Taking your time, you can set up the styles properly in about thirty minutes; to replace the dysfunctional styles with functional ones throughout your document, you might use Search and Replace.
Whenever you begin a new project, clear the settings out. There's a couple ways to do this. You can choose Tools Customize, and hit Reset Usage Data. But more than likely, you've forgotten to do that like I do. So, instead, when you go to use a bulleted or numbered list, go ahead and reset them all. I did not do anything special to show you the screenshot below. I just opened Word 2003, and hit Format Bullets and Numbering, and there it was, already like it is in the picture. Doesn't look like the default, does it? Nope!
With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.
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