Create your first ticket, without the numbering. Then where you want the number to appear first, press Ctrl-F9 to create a pair of field braces (ie '{}') and fill in between them so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \# 00000}'. Then, where you want the duplicate number to appear, create another field and fill it it so that you get '{SEQ Ticket \c \# 00000}'. From there it's mostly just a matter of duplicating the whole ticket however many times you want. When you're done press Ctrl-A to select the whole document, then press F9 to update the fields.
If you go into Print Preview, the field will automatically update in the Headers or Footers. Unfortunately, if you also have the field in the main document, (for example, in the coversheet), going into Print Preview won't update it – but printing will, provided that you have Update Fields ticked under Tools + Options + Print. You can also update the field by selecting it and pressing F9. Or you can press Ctrl+A followed by F9 to update all the fields in the main document in one go.
Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.
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You must set up the heading numbering as a multilevel list linked to the heading styles. If you select the 1 Heading 1, 1.1 Heading 2, 1.1.1 Heading 3 list type in the Multilevel List gallery, the list levels will be linked to the styles automatically, will have the numbering you want, and will restart after higher levels. For more on this, seehttp://www.shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/numbering20072010.html.
Creating a numbered list is simple and most users catch on right away. One more thought before we move on—use numbered lists correctly. A numbered list, by its nature implies that the number of items or the order of those items has meaning. A list of simple facts, where neither order nor number have meaning is a bulleted list, not a numbered list. You can turn what might otherwise be a bulleted list by forcing a number into the mix, as I've done with our example list. Remove the word Seven from the title and you have a bulleted list!
Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one: desktop numbering using word
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