There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:

To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog.


This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
Restart numbering using LISTNUM fields. This method makes use of the fact that LISTNUM fields can refer to the same numbering schemes as numbered paragraphs, and can be used to set the number for a particular list level explicitly. This is a reliable ad-hoc method of restarting lists, but needs care and understanding if there are several numbering schemes in use in a document.
I tried all the answers offered here (Kevin's "reapply" answer, importing a style set from a working document, saving as .doc, using the "update to match selection" option to copy a style from a different document, using the "Change Styles" option to do the same, ticking the "Automatically Update" option, clearing formatting and manually recreating the style, changing the theme of the document and then redefining the multi-level list), and many of them worked temporarily, but the problem persisted every time I reopened the document.
You’ve got some tips to help make your raffle more successful. You’ve got several free Word ticket templates to choose from. You know how to sequentially number tickets in two different ways. All that is left for you to do is go sell those tickets, have the draw, and then feel good about helping someone out. All for pennies on the dollar over ordering custom made tickets.
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
In Word 2003, in Format | Bullets and Numbering, choose the Outline Numbered tab. The second pane in the bottom row of the gallery should show 1 Heading 1, 1.1 Heading 2, 1.1.1 Heading 3. If it does not, select it and click Reset (and answer Yes). With the insertion point in a Heading 1 paragraph, apply that format. The numbering will already be just what you want and will be linked to the heading styles. If you want to fine-tune the indents, you can click on Customize.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
Hi - are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can't change the font size ... you'll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
The very first step you need to do is to drag your cursor towards the Help icon in the new word document. This icon usually appears in the right part of the top portion of the tool bar listing. It is depicted by a question mark symbol. You have to left click on this menu with your mouse and you need to opt from the type of help listed in the drop-down carte du jour. (Ticket Invitation Templates Download)
Having personalized raffle tickets printed can get expensive, especially if you operate a fund-raising operation and must do this often. An alternative to using costly printing services is to use the raffle ticket template. With the raffle ticket template, you save money. The raffle ticket template also gives you complete creative control. Simply by opening a template in Microsoft Word means that can design it yourself by adding both text and images, all from the comfort of your own home.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
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