After adding a few more facts, as shown in Figure F, you might notice something new—the two-digit numbers don't align with the previous one-digit numbers. You could leave the list as is, but most likely you'll want to adjust it. Leaving it as is makes the reader uncomfortable; it's simply not as readable as it should be. We expect numbers to align using the period character or the right-most digit if there's no punctuation.
Thank you again for your assistance. I took care of the text boxes and everything works quite well. I had some aggravating moments trying to figure out where the \* MERGEFORMAT switch was coming from; I kept deleting it and it kept coming back like a mosquito. I assume it had something to do with the text boxes. Anyway, the document is now a thing of beauty. Thank you.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.


I tried all the answers offered here (Kevin's "reapply" answer, importing a style set from a working document, saving as .doc, using the "update to match selection" option to copy a style from a different document, using the "Change Styles" option to do the same, ticking the "Automatically Update" option, clearing formatting and manually recreating the style, changing the theme of the document and then redefining the multi-level list), and many of them worked temporarily, but the problem persisted every time I reopened the document.

So I'm going to click on all seven types, one at a time, and hit the Reset button. This resets them all to Word's original installation defaults, and I don't get weirded out by all the weird formatting it tries to pick up from previous documents. If they need to be Reset, the Reset button is available. Each time you hit Reset, you need to confirm that you want to do so.
Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
Summary: If you need to include serial numbers in your printed matter (labels, letters, documents, etc.), the best way is through the use of Word's mail-merge capabilities. This tip outlines how you can use this capability to get just the serial numbers you need. (This tip works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
There are two ways of setting up numbered styles and making this link. You can either do it manually, working from the style at the top level of the list template, as explained by Shauna Kelly in How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in your Microsoft Word document, or you can create the list template and link each level to the appropriate style using a VBA macro.
Change all other existing text to reflect the correct date and prizes by highlighting the words and either editing or deleting the existing text. Font size and style can be adjusted using the font toolbar above the document. Images can be added by using the Insert menu in the toolbar and following the same process as inserting images to a Word document.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
×