Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

After adding a few more facts, as shown in Figure F, you might notice something new—the two-digit numbers don't align with the previous one-digit numbers. You could leave the list as is, but most likely you'll want to adjust it. Leaving it as is makes the reader uncomfortable; it's simply not as readable as it should be. We expect numbers to align using the period character or the right-most digit if there's no punctuation.
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Thank you again for your assistance. I took care of the text boxes and everything works quite well. I had some aggravating moments trying to figure out where the \* MERGEFORMAT switch was coming from; I kept deleting it and it kept coming back like a mosquito. I assume it had something to do with the text boxes. Anyway, the document is now a thing of beauty. Thank you.
I've seen this (black rectangles instead of numbers) in one document that I received from someone else. I cured it by going through the sequence in the article that Charles cited, starting from the "Define New Multilevel List" choice in the menu of the Multilevel List button. (If there's already a list in effect, its settings will appear in the dialog, and you just have to repeat the setting for the affected level(s).)
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
Just download the Raffle tickets with consecutive numbering and matching stubs from the Microsoft Office website. It is a 2003 version and I have Office 2010.   The template has sequential numbering and displays 8 tickets on 2 pages, but I need 3000 tickets.  How do I add more tickets to this document.  I have looked online for tutorials, but most are for starting a ticket from scratch.  Please help!!
I tried all the answers offered here (Kevin's "reapply" answer, importing a style set from a working document, saving as .doc, using the "update to match selection" option to copy a style from a different document, using the "Change Styles" option to do the same, ticking the "Automatically Update" option, clearing formatting and manually recreating the style, changing the theme of the document and then redefining the multi-level list), and many of them worked temporarily, but the problem persisted every time I reopened the document.
The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).

Even if you did copy the content of another's blog, if your blog is not a for-money effort I don't think anybody can say scat about it. Especially since you posted not just a credit to the source but an actual working link. Wordknowhow should be thanking you for driving traffic to his undoubtedly for-money blog page – not whining about it. Given his reaction here, I'm disinclined to visit his page. Pretty sure I can find the information elsewhere. What a self-important crank that guy seems to be.

Using previously un-used heading levels would be more suitable for situations where you want to maintain two separate numbered lists that both make use of the "magic" properties of the built-in headings; for example, this would be the case when you set up appendix numbering as discussed in the article at https://shaunakelly.com/word/numbering/numberingappendixes.html.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one: desktop numbering using word
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