This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
I cannot (despite 3 weeks of trying) set up outline numbering on MS Word (Tried 2003 & 2007 with same problem). I link all the headings to styles and understand the need to set the customise number box so that only the one number box style applies to the whole document. But when I try to set up the 9 levels, the number format appears fine at first, appearing as 1; 1.1; 1.1.1; 1.1.1.1 etc as desired but when I try to display the previous level number (level 1 number with level 2 heading) to appear as:
Warning: Avoid using the Format > Bullets and Numbering dialog to restart list numbering (and its equivalent, the ListGalleries collection, in VBA code). Accessing list templates via the list galleries has been implicated in building up extra list templates in documents, changing list template names, and losing links between list templates and styles.

Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Whenever you begin a new project, clear the settings out. There's a couple ways to do this. You can choose Tools Customize, and hit Reset Usage Data. But more than likely, you've forgotten to do that like I do. So, instead, when you go to use a bulleted or numbered list, go ahead and reset them all. I did not do anything special to show you the screenshot below. I just opened Word 2003, and hit Format Bullets and Numbering, and there it was, already like it is in the picture. Doesn't look like the default, does it? Nope!
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
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